Bookish’s 2019 Reading Challenge: 52 Ways to #KillYourTBR

Bookish’s 2019 Reading Challenge: 52 Ways to #KillYourTBR

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reading challenge

If you’re like us, you’ve got big plans for 2019. Reading plans, that is. With the new year upon us, it’s a great time to set a new reading goal. To help you get started, we recommend joining Bookish’s 2019 reading challenge. We’ve come up with 52 ways to #killyourtbr—one for every week of the year. Some are fan favorites from past challenges, and others are brand new! Check out the challenge below and get reading!

Join in the conversation and share your reading challenge progress by using #killyourtbr on social media.

Looking for a monthly challenge? Come back in January for Bookish Bingo!

  1. A book you bought for the cover
  2. A book by an author you’ve met
  3. A book you’re embarrassed you haven’t read yet
  4. A book that is under 220 pages
  5. A book that came out the year you were born
  6. A book whose title uses alliteration
  7. A book in your best friend’s favorite genre
  8. A book from an independent publisher
  9. A book you borrowed from the library
  10. A book featuring a fictional language
  11. A novel that includes a recipe (Bonus points for making the recipe)
  12. A book won in a BookishFirst raffle
  13. A book about going on a quest
  14. A book set in a city you’ve visited
  15. A book with a dust jacket
  16. A book by two or more authors
  17. A book that is over 1000 pages
  18. A book that’s been out for less than a month
  19. A book with a name in the title
  20. A book from a genre you want to read more of
  21. A book written by a Native American author
  22. A book with an asexual character
  23. A book you were given as a gift
  24. A book translated from Spanish
  25. An award-winning graphic novel
  26. A book featuring a false confession
  27. A book you meant to read in 2018
  28. A book featuring a memorable cat
  29. A book set in South America
  30. A book with a cover you kind of hate (but a story you love)
  31. A book by an author you’ve never heard of before
  32. A book of short stories
  33. A book featuring a nonbinary protagonist
  34. A book you’ve been waiting for forever
  35. A book about intersectional feminism
  36. A book with a place in the title
  37. A book bought at your local bookstore
  38. A book by an author you’re thankful for
  39. A book with gorgeous descriptions
  40. A book signed by the author
  41. A book set in Africa
  42. A book about mental health
  43. A book written by an immigrant
  44. A retelling
  45. A book about incarceration
  46. A book recommended by an author
  47. A book with a person of color on the cover
  48. A book by an author who uses a pen name
  49. A book whose title includes a verb
  50. A book recommended by a librarian
  51. A book being adapted in 2019
  52. A book you found in a Little Free Library


Need a recommendation? Just ask in the comments!

31 COMMENTS

  1. New here – I love this! Is there a way to interact with everyone to see what they are reading for the prompts each week?

  2. Perhaps one of our reading-friends can suggest shortish, novella-lengthed books for my non-reading high school classroom? I’ve searched, read, researched and posted with little to show for the effort. We’ve read The Old Man an the Sea, and The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Anthem is a possible and The Liitle Prince, too. It’s so difficult to introduce reading to students coming from a non-reading family culture.
    Thank you in advance.

    • Hi! Maybe Animal Farm or Stone Cold? A few other classics that you might have considered already are The Outsiders, The Stranger, A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch, The Metamorphosis and Heart of Darkness. I would consider sci-fi and fantasy novellas too. One of my favourites is Legion by Brandon Sanderson.

  3. I’ve never met an author. The closest I’ve come is via email to the few authors that I read ARCs for … would/could that count as “meeting” an author?

    • We definitely leave the prompts to your own interpretation! Not every single prompt is possible for every reader.

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