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Where God Happens

Discovering Christ in One Another

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Paperback published by New Seeds (Shambhala)

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About This Book
The place "where God happens," according to Rowan Williams's striking new reading of the Desert Fathers and Mothers, is between each other. It's a truth that we of the twenty-first century most urgently need to learn in order to heal the experience of alienation that has become endemic to our age, and these odd and appealing ancient figures, surprisingly, hold keys to this healing.

The fourth-century Christian hermits of Egypt, Syria, and Palestine understood the truth of Christian community profoundly, and their lives demonstrate it vividly—even though they often lived in solitude and isolation. The author breaks through our preconceived ideas of the Desert Fathers to reveal them in a new light: as true and worthy role models—even for us in our modern lives—who have much to teach us about dealing with the anxieties, uncertainties, and sense of isolation that have become hallmarks of modern life. They especially embody valuable insights about community, about how to live together in an intimate and meaningful way. Williams makes these radical figures, who clearly have a special place in his heart, come to life in a new way for everyone.

The book includes an appendix of selections from the teachings of the Desert Fathers.
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The place "where God happens," according to Rowan Williams's striking new reading of the Desert Fathers and Mothers, is between each other. It's a truth that we of the twenty-first century most urgently need to learn in order to heal the experience of alienation that has become endemic to our age, and these odd and appealing ancient figures, surprisingly, hold keys to this healing.

The fourth-century Christian hermits of Egypt, Syria, and Palestine understood the truth of Christian community profoundly, and their lives demonstrate it vividly—even though they often lived in solitude and isolation. The author breaks through our preconceived ideas of the Desert Fathers to reveal them in a new light: as true and worthy role models—even for us in our modern lives—who have much to teach us about dealing with the anxieties, uncertainties, and sense of isolation that have become hallmarks of modern life. They especially embody valuable insights about community, about how to live together in an intimate and meaningful way. Williams makes these radical figures, who clearly have a special place in his heart, come to life in a new way for everyone.

The book includes an appendix of selections from the teachings of the Desert Fathers.
Product Details
Paperback (192 pages)
Published: August 14, 2007
Publisher: Shambhala
Imprint: New Seeds
ISBN: 9781590303900
Other books byRowan Williams
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    'Communion and otherness: how can these be reconciled?' In this wide-ranging study, the distinguished Orthodox theologian, Metropolitan John (Zizioulas) of Pergamon, seeks to answer that question. In his celebrated book, Being as Communion (1985), he emphasised the importance of communion for life and for unity. In this important companion volume he now explores the complementary fact that communion is the basis for true otherness and identity. With a constant awareness of the deepest existential questions of today, Metropolitan John probes the Christian tradition and highlights the existential concerns that already underlay the writings of the Greek fathers and the definitions of the early ecumenical councils. In a vigorous and challenging way, he defends the freedom to be other as an intrinsic characteristic of personhood, fulfilled only in communion. After a major opening chapter on the ontology of otherness, written specially for this volume, the theme is systematically developed with reference to the Trinity, Christology, anthropology and ecclesiology. Another new chapter defends the idea that the Father is cause of the Trinity, as taught by the Cappadocian fathers, and replies to criticisms of this view. The final chapter responds to the customary separation of ecclesiology from mysticism and strongly favours a mystical understanding of the body of Christ as a whole. Other papers, previously published but some not easily obtainable, are all revised for their inclusion here. This is a further contribution to dialogue on some of the most vital issues for theology and the Church from one of the leading figures in modern ecumenism.

    Teresa of Avila

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    The Dwelling of the Light

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    To look at an icon of Christ is to do far more than view an image of a human life lived long ago. As Christians in the Orthodox tradition have understood for nearly fifteen hundred years, it is to be brought into the presence of the one who radiates the light and love of God. Such an encounter cannot leave the viewer unchanged.Drawing on this rich source of spiritual devotion, Archbishop Rowan Williams shows readers of all Christian traditions how to understand and interact with four classical icons of Jesus: the transfigurationthe resurrectionChrist as a member of the eternal TrinityChrist as judge of the world and ruler of allAs readers learn to look prayerfully rather than analytically at these icons, they will find themselves drawn into the energy and action of the icons themselves. Speaking a powerful word of challenge to many of our contemporary concerns and anxieties, these classical works of religious devotion invite viewers to discover and contemplate all that can be found in the face of Jesus Christ. The book includes a concise introduction in which Williams beautifully illuminates the history and role of icons in Christian worship. Illustrated in color throughout, "The Dwelling of the Light will be a treasured source of spiritual inspiration, ideal for personal use and for giving to others.

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