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When a Dad Says "I Love You"

with audio recording

By , (Illustrator)

eBook published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)

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About This Book
How do you like to hear “I love you”? This cozy picture book shows all the ways dads can say it best.

Dads know how to do everything. They can help with homework and carry you on their shoulders. They can make pancakes and teach you how to sing songs. These loving actions are just some of the ways dads show how much they care—and no matter how he says it, “I love you” is wonderful to hear!

From bestselling author Douglas Wood and illustrator Jennifer Bell, a sunny, cuddly testament to the bond between father and child.
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How do you like to hear “I love you”? This cozy picture book shows all the ways dads can say it best.

Dads know how to do everything. They can help with homework and carry you on their shoulders. They can make pancakes and teach you how to sing songs. These loving actions are just some of the ways dads show how much they care—and no matter how he says it, “I love you” is wonderful to hear!

From bestselling author Douglas Wood and illustrator Jennifer Bell, a sunny, cuddly testament to the bond between father and child.
Product Details
eBook (32 pages)
Published: April 16, 2013
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Imprint: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 9781442450493
Other books byDouglas Wood
  • Grandad's Prayers of the Earth

    Grandad's Prayers of the Earth
    "Wood conveys a sense of something larger in the world, and gives voice to the human longing to understand." – KIRKUS REVIEWS (starred review) Grandad is the boy’s best friend. Being with him always makes the world seem right. And how vast that world is: a world of tall trees that reach for the clouds and sun and moon and stars – and what else is reaching for heaven but a prayer? Each time he and Grandad walk in the woods, the boy listens for the prayers of the earth. And finally the boy asks: "Are our prayers answered?" One day, long after Grandad is gone, long after the boy is grown, he understands Grandad’s reply: "If we listen very closely, a prayer is often its own answer." Douglas Wood, author of OLD TURTLE, has written a wise and moving story for all ages, beautifully illustrated by the acclaimed P.J. Lynch.

    Old Turtle

    Old Turtle
    Wood's celebrated, bestselling fable of ecology and spirituality, reissued in March 2007 with a beautiful new jacket design. Long ago, the animals, rocks, waters, and trees of the earth began an argument about God. Is He a wind who is never still? Is He a rock that never moves? Is He high above or here among us? Venerable Old Turtle quitely answered: God is all of these things. In 1992, Old Turtle burst upon the publishing world as a uniquely satisfying fable about ecology, peace, and the interconnectedness of all beigns. Few books can match the understated, universal power of its hopeful message. The beautiful repackaging Scholastic is releasing in March 2007 makes it the perfect gift book.

    Fawn Island

    Fawn Island
    Fawn Island is a place where crows serve as alarm clocks, white-throated sparrows leave the tracks of their songs upon the evening hush, and chickadees help a woodsman learn to whistle. The island is also a jumping-off place for journeys large and small, earthly and spiritual -- to nearby Mallard Island, Gull Island, or Bald Rock, by sea kayak into the wild recesses of sprawling Voyageurs National Park, or on a midnight paddle in which the paddler can reach the silent wilderness of the stars themselves. In his latest book, best-selling author Douglas Wood guides the reader on a deep journey into the heart of the North Woods.For Wood, Fawn Island is not merely a charming wilderness hideaway; it is the entry to realms of thought and meaning as well. From its pine-clad shores he probes for insights into the nature of neighborliness and independence, of community and solitude. Out of an ancient Ojibwe legend comes an exploration of personal loss and life after death. Wood questions the notion of being a "force of nature" and the concept of the passage of time in the context of seemingly eternal trees, lakes, rock ledges, and stars. From beneath the ascending trunks of pines comes an inquiry into the principles of optimism and, finally, a personal response to the eternal question: Is the universe a friendly place?Embedded in the text like roots of the island's pines is Wood's gentle, self-effacing humor and the author's own original pen-and-ink drawings that superbly evoke the poetry and mystery of this "small bit of rock and tree", this "lucky place" in the wilderness.

    What Dads Can't Do

    What Dads Can't Do
    There are lots of things that regular people can do but dads can't. Dads can't cross the street without holding hands. They can push, but can't swing. When dads play hide-and-seek they always get found, but they have a hard time finding you. Dads really need to be kissed good night at bedtime. It's a wonder they make it through life at all!

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