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Warriors in Uniform

The Legacy of American Indian Heroism

By , (Contributor)

Hardcover published by National Geographic (National Geographic Society)

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About This Book
Native Americans have willingly served in the U.S. military during each of this country’s wars, and their current numbers in the armed forces exceed the percentage of any other ethnic group. Their stories encompass heroism and tragedy, humor and stoicism, loyalty and conflict—all part of the riveting experience of Warriors in Uniform. This illustrated history divulges the exploits of the last Confederate general—a Cherokee—to lay down his arms...the code talkers who used tribal languages to thwart the enemy in World War II...the first Native American woman to give her life as a soldier...those serving in Iraq today...and many others. Spiritual, poignant, gripping, even shocking (warriors still took scalps in Vietnam), it reveals how ancient traditions of war persevere and how the warrior designation is a great honor to the Native American community. Packed with first person accounts and sharing little-known insights into a culture that is still misunderstood, Warriors in Uniform is a page-turning epic and a stunning gallery of never-before-seen artifacts from personal collections. Former senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell and other distinguished Native Americans have contributed to the collection. Following on the success of Native Universe and Trail to Wounded Knee, this book is already generating great interest throughout the Native American community. As the only book to cover Native American warriors from the 1700s to present, it stands out among other titles on the market.
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Native Americans have willingly served in the U.S. military during each of this country’s wars, and their current numbers in the armed forces exceed the percentage of any other ethnic group. Their stories encompass heroism and tragedy, humor and stoicism, loyalty and conflict—all part of the riveting experience of Warriors in Uniform. This illustrated history divulges the exploits of the last Confederate general—a Cherokee—to lay down his arms...the code talkers who used tribal languages to thwart the enemy in World War II...the first Native American woman to give her life as a soldier...those serving in Iraq today...and many others. Spiritual, poignant, gripping, even shocking (warriors still took scalps in Vietnam), it reveals how ancient traditions of war persevere and how the warrior designation is a great honor to the Native American community. Packed with first person accounts and sharing little-known insights into a culture that is still misunderstood, Warriors in Uniform is a page-turning epic and a stunning gallery of never-before-seen artifacts from personal collections. Former senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell and other distinguished Native Americans have contributed to the collection. Following on the success of Native Universe and Trail to Wounded Knee, this book is already generating great interest throughout the Native American community. As the only book to cover Native American warriors from the 1700s to present, it stands out among other titles on the market.
Product Details
Hardcover (216 pages)
Published: November 18, 2008
Publisher: National Geographic Society
Imprint: National Geographic
ISBN: 9781426203619
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