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Warriors at the Little Bighorn 1876

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Paperback published by Osprey Publishing (Osprey Publishing)

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About This Book
The battle which took place on the Little Bighorn river on June 25, 1876 has passed into legend as “Custer's Last Stand”. This remarkable book is a unique analysis of the oral and pictorial evidence for the appearance of nearly 30 named Sioux and Cheyenne warriors who were present that day, and for their parts in the battle. The fruit of many years' study by one of today’s most internationally respected interpreters and illustrators of Native American material culture, it offers biographical notes and meticulously researched color reconstructions, together with rare photographs and pictographs.
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The battle which took place on the Little Bighorn river on June 25, 1876 has passed into legend as “Custer's Last Stand”. This remarkable book is a unique analysis of the oral and pictorial evidence for the appearance of nearly 30 named Sioux and Cheyenne warriors who were present that day, and for their parts in the battle. The fruit of many years' study by one of today’s most internationally respected interpreters and illustrators of Native American material culture, it offers biographical notes and meticulously researched color reconstructions, together with rare photographs and pictographs.
Product Details
Paperback (48 pages)
Published: April 27, 2004
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
Imprint: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781841766669
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