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There's Nothing in This Book That I Meant to Say

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Paperback published by Three Rivers Press (Crown Publishing Group)

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About This Book
Part memoir, part monologue, with a dash of startling honesty, There’s Nothing in This Book That I Meant to Say features biographies of legendary historical figures from which Paula Poundstone can’t help digressing to tell her own story. Mining gold from the lives of Abraham Lincoln, Helen Keller, Joan of Arc, and Beethoven, among others, the eccentric and utterly inimitable mind of Paula Poundstone dissects, observes, and comments on the successes and failures of her own life with surprising candor and spot-on comedic timing in this unique laugh-out-loud book.

If you like Paula Poundstone’s ironic and blindingly intelligent humor, you’ll love this wryly observant, funny, and touching book.

Paula Poundstone on . . .

The sources of her self-esteem: “A couple of years ago I was reunited with a guy I knew in the fifth grade. He said, “All the other fifth-grade guys liked the pretty girls, but I liked you.” It’s hard to know if a guy is sincere when he lays it on that thick.

The battle between fatigue and informed citizenship: I play a videotape of The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer every night, but sometimes I only get as far as the theme song (da da-da-da da-ah) before I fall asleep. Sometimes as soon as Margaret Warner says whether or not Jim Lehrer is on vacation I drift right off. Somehow just knowing he’s well comforts me.

The occult: I need to know exactly what day I’m gonna die so that I don’t bother putting away leftovers the night before.

TV’s misplaced priorities: Someday in the midst of the State of the Union address they’ll break in with, “We interrupt this program to bring you a little clip from Bewitched.”

Travel: In London I went to the queen’s house. I went as a tourist—she didn’t invite me so she could pick my brain: “What do you think of my face on the pound? Too serious?”

Air-conditioning in Florida: If it were as cold outside in the winter as they make it inside in the summer, they’d put the heat on. It makes no sense.

The scandal: The judge said I was the best probationer he ever had. Talk about proud.


With a foreword by Mary Tyler Moore


From the Hardcover edition.
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Part memoir, part monologue, with a dash of startling honesty, There’s Nothing in This Book That I Meant to Say features biographies of legendary historical figures from which Paula Poundstone can’t help digressing to tell her own story. Mining gold from the lives of Abraham Lincoln, Helen Keller, Joan of Arc, and Beethoven, among others, the eccentric and utterly inimitable mind of Paula Poundstone dissects, observes, and comments on the successes and failures of her own life with surprising candor and spot-on comedic timing in this unique laugh-out-loud book.

If you like Paula Poundstone’s ironic and blindingly intelligent humor, you’ll love this wryly observant, funny, and touching book.

Paula Poundstone on . . .

The sources of her self-esteem: “A couple of years ago I was reunited with a guy I knew in the fifth grade. He said, “All the other fifth-grade guys liked the pretty girls, but I liked you.” It’s hard to know if a guy is sincere when he lays it on that thick.

The battle between fatigue and informed citizenship: I play a videotape of The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer every night, but sometimes I only get as far as the theme song (da da-da-da da-ah) before I fall asleep. Sometimes as soon as Margaret Warner says whether or not Jim Lehrer is on vacation I drift right off. Somehow just knowing he’s well comforts me.

The occult: I need to know exactly what day I’m gonna die so that I don’t bother putting away leftovers the night before.

TV’s misplaced priorities: Someday in the midst of the State of the Union address they’ll break in with, “We interrupt this program to bring you a little clip from Bewitched.”

Travel: In London I went to the queen’s house. I went as a tourist—she didn’t invite me so she could pick my brain: “What do you think of my face on the pound? Too serious?”

Air-conditioning in Florida: If it were as cold outside in the winter as they make it inside in the summer, they’d put the heat on. It makes no sense.

The scandal: The judge said I was the best probationer he ever had. Talk about proud.


With a foreword by Mary Tyler Moore


From the Hardcover edition.
Product Details
Paperback (288 pages)
Published: November 27, 2007
Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
Imprint: Three Rivers Press
ISBN: 9780307382283
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    Are you looking for a fun way to engage students in improving and retaining their mathematical skills? Whether your students need a curricular supplement, a summer review package, or an opportunity to do math at home with parents, humor them with Math with a Laugh. Math with a Laughbrings together math practice and comedy - some would say for the first time - offering students and teachers funny and functional skills-development experiences. Longtime math teacher Faye Nisonoff Ruopp provides problems carefully crafted to help children strengthen their mathematical thinking. Faye's former student, star comedian Paula Poundstone, sets the problems within funny stories so entertaining to read and solve that students will become immersed in the mathematics. In You Can't Keep Slope Downeighth and ninth graders encounter age-appropriate problems involving ratios and proportions, simplification of numerical expressions, identification of the meaning of variables and constants, the solving of polynomials and quadratics, the application of the Pythagorean theorem, and the measurement of central tendency in a dataset. Each problem links directly to state and national standards and increases students' capabilities with foundational and computational principles. Math with a Laughreinforces basic skills and improves retention in class, over the summer, or at home. Ruopp's teaching notes provide answers and help you reinforce the concepts behind the problems, then extend them into other mathematical learning. Math with a Laughwill enliven any math environment. It's an effective way to help kids build and retain mathematical knowledge and a humorous opportunity to turn rote skill drills into enjoyable learning. Purchase all three books in the Math with a Laugh Seriesthrough this special offerand receive a CD that features Paula Poundstone reading selected problems from each volume. From pancakes to Pythagoras, you and your students will lauge as Paula reads her favorite lessons, making the CD a one-of-a-kind tool for engaging students' interest as they listen to and work through corresponding problems from the books.

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    And Other Skill-Building Math Activities,...
    Are you looking for a fun way to engage students in improving and retaining their mathematical skills? Whether your students need a curricular supplement, a summer review package, or an opportunity to do math at home with parents, humor them with Math with a Laugh. Math with a Laughbrings together math practice and comedy-some would say for the first time-offering students and teachers funny and functional skills-development experiences. Longtime math teacher Faye Nisonoff Ruopp provides problems carefully crafted to help children strengthen their mathematical thinking. Faye's former student, star comedian Paula Poundstone, sets the problems within funny stories so entertaining to read and solve that students will become immersed in the mathematics. In Venn Can We Be Friends?sixth and seventh graders solve a variety of developmentally appropriate problems involving operations with fractions and decimals, applying order of operations, solving linear equations, graphing Cartesian coordinates, determining surface area and volume, and graphing statistical data. Each problem links directly to state and national standards and increases students' capabilities with foundational and computational principles. The Math with a LaughSeries reinforces basic skills and improves retention in class, over the summer, or at home. Ruopp's teaching notes provide answers and help you reinforce the concepts behind the problems, then extend them into other mathematical learning. Math with a Laughwill enliven any math environment. It's an effective way to help kids build and retain mathematical knowledge and a humorous opportunity to turn rote skill drills into enjoyable learning. Purchase all three books in the Math with a Laugh Seriesthrough this special offerand receive a CD that features Paula Poundstone reading selected problems from each volume. From pancakes to Pythagoras, you and your students will lauge as Paula reads her favorite lessons, making the CD a one-of-a-kind tool for engaging students' interest as they listen to and work through corresponding problems from the books.

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