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The Translation of Dr. Apelles

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Paperback published by Vintage (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book
Dr. Apelles, a translator of ancient texts, has made an unsettling discovery: a manuscript that has languished for years, written in a language that only he speaks. Moving back and forth between the scholar and his text, from a lone man in a labyrinthine archive to a pair of beautiful young Indian lovers in an unspoiled and snowy woodland, David Treuer weaves together two love stories. Enthralling and suspenseful, The Translation of Dr. Apelles dares to redefine the Native American novel.
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Dr. Apelles, a translator of ancient texts, has made an unsettling discovery: a manuscript that has languished for years, written in a language that only he speaks. Moving back and forth between the scholar and his text, from a lone man in a labyrinthine archive to a pair of beautiful young Indian lovers in an unspoiled and snowy woodland, David Treuer weaves together two love stories. Enthralling and suspenseful, The Translation of Dr. Apelles dares to redefine the Native American novel.
Product Details
Paperback (336 pages)
Published: February 12, 2008
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307386625
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Favorite QuotesFROM THIS BOOK
  • Guerre. Non pas entre le peuple et ses ennemis sur l'autre berge de la rivière ou ceux de plus hat, près de sa source -ceux-là restaient des ennemis.

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  • Un livre très particulier dans une bibliothèque vast et merveilleuse ... Content de la première phrase, il se retourne.

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