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The Night Circus

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eBook published by Anchor (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.

Author Q&A with Erin Morgenstern

This is a lovely and unique story. Why a circus? How did this story first come to you—through a character, a plotline, an emotion?

The story came as a location created out of desperation. I was working on a different story altogether, one that was becoming progressively more and more boring because nothing was happening. I needed something exciting to happen and I couldn't figure out how to do it with the locations I had so I sent the characters to the circus. That circus was immediately much more interesting and eventually I abandoned that other story and its characters entirely and focused on the circus instead. What eventually became The Night Circus started from exploring that spontaneously-created location, figuring out who created it and who performed in it and what its story was.
 
What was your inspiration for some of the amazing acts in this circus?

Some of them were traditional circus acts or attractions made a bit more unique, like the acrobats performing directly overhead or the carousel that doesn't simply go in circles. The Cloud Maze is a play on a climbing maze I hazily recall from childhood visits to the Boston Children's Museum. Other tents were created based on color, or lack thereof. I had a lot of dark tents and wanted something lighter and white, the Ice Garden developed from that relatively simple starting point. 
 
Do you have a favorite character?

It's impossible to pick a true favorite, though Poppet & Widget are very dear to my heart as they're the first of the characters to turn up in my imagination. They're also just plain fun, both individually and as a pair. 
 
What was the most challenging aspect of developing this story?

It didn't have a plot for a very long time. Really, my biggest challenge was finding the actual story within all the atmosphere. I had the place and the characters and the feel of the book long before it had a proper story structure to tie everything together. The novel went through a great many revisions before it figured out what it wanted to be, I tried things that didn't work and then things that sort of worked and replaced old ideas with new ones until I got it right.
 
Is there an emotion that you had to spend a lot of time with that made you uncomfortable?

I'm an emotional sort of person in general and I have a vivid imagination, so I feel the whole spectrum of emotion strongly when I write. It's something I'm used to, though, so nothing in particular made me uncomfortable. There is a lot of frustration felt by various characters, which is not the nicest emotion to be spending a lot of time with, but it helps to drive characters to actions which bring different emotions along.
 
Tell me about your writing life. Do you have any rituals?

I binge write. I think it's because I started seriously writing by participating in National Novel Writing Month, an online-based challenge to write 50,000 words in 30 days. I don't have as tight a time limit anymore but I still write in long marathon sessions and then I won't write for a while, I'm not a write-every-day writer. I go back and forth between input phases where I'm reading a lot or trying to get out and explore the world a bit and soak up inspirations and then I'll get back into output mode and write and write and write. 

I don't have any particular rituals, I sometimes like to write in longhand when I'm searching for ideas but I do the vast majority by typing, I can't always keep up with my thoughts longhand. I'm not a coffeeshop writer because I feel obliged to order more coffee and then I end up over-caffeinated.
 
What’s the one true thing you learned from your characters in this novel?

I think it's something that I knew already but explored more with these characters, that nothing is as simple as black or white, good or evil. There are all those shades of grey and everyone acts from a place that they see as right and true. (Though they are allowed to change their minds.)
 

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The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.

Author Q&A with Erin Morgenstern

This is a lovely and unique story. Why a circus? How did this story first come to you—through a character, a plotline, an emotion?

The story came as a location created out of desperation. I was working on a different story altogether, one that was becoming progressively more and more boring because nothing was happening. I needed something exciting to happen and I couldn't figure out how to do it with the locations I had so I sent the characters to the circus. That circus was immediately much more interesting and eventually I abandoned that other story and its characters entirely and focused on the circus instead. What eventually became The Night Circus started from exploring that spontaneously-created location, figuring out who created it and who performed in it and what its story was.
 
What was your inspiration for some of the amazing acts in this circus?

Some of them were traditional circus acts or attractions made a bit more unique, like the acrobats performing directly overhead or the carousel that doesn't simply go in circles. The Cloud Maze is a play on a climbing maze I hazily recall from childhood visits to the Boston Children's Museum. Other tents were created based on color, or lack thereof. I had a lot of dark tents and wanted something lighter and white, the Ice Garden developed from that relatively simple starting point. 
 
Do you have a favorite character?

It's impossible to pick a true favorite, though Poppet & Widget are very dear to my heart as they're the first of the characters to turn up in my imagination. They're also just plain fun, both individually and as a pair. 
 
What was the most challenging aspect of developing this story?

It didn't have a plot for a very long time. Really, my biggest challenge was finding the actual story within all the atmosphere. I had the place and the characters and the feel of the book long before it had a proper story structure to tie everything together. The novel went through a great many revisions before it figured out what it wanted to be, I tried things that didn't work and then things that sort of worked and replaced old ideas with new ones until I got it right.
 
Is there an emotion that you had to spend a lot of time with that made you uncomfortable?

I'm an emotional sort of person in general and I have a vivid imagination, so I feel the whole spectrum of emotion strongly when I write. It's something I'm used to, though, so nothing in particular made me uncomfortable. There is a lot of frustration felt by various characters, which is not the nicest emotion to be spending a lot of time with, but it helps to drive characters to actions which bring different emotions along.
 
Tell me about your writing life. Do you have any rituals?

I binge write. I think it's because I started seriously writing by participating in National Novel Writing Month, an online-based challenge to write 50,000 words in 30 days. I don't have as tight a time limit anymore but I still write in long marathon sessions and then I won't write for a while, I'm not a write-every-day writer. I go back and forth between input phases where I'm reading a lot or trying to get out and explore the world a bit and soak up inspirations and then I'll get back into output mode and write and write and write. 

I don't have any particular rituals, I sometimes like to write in longhand when I'm searching for ideas but I do the vast majority by typing, I can't always keep up with my thoughts longhand. I'm not a coffeeshop writer because I feel obliged to order more coffee and then I end up over-caffeinated.
 
What’s the one true thing you learned from your characters in this novel?

I think it's something that I knew already but explored more with these characters, that nothing is as simple as black or white, good or evil. There are all those shades of grey and everyone acts from a place that they see as right and true. (Though they are allowed to change their minds.)
 

Product Details
eBook (384 pages)
Published: September 13, 2011
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Anchor
ISBN: 9780385534642
Other books byErin Morgenstern
  • El circo de la noche

    El circo de la noche
    El circo llega sin aviso, sin anuncio. Simplemente aparece. Dentro de sus carpas blancas y negras se vive una experiencia única, un banquete para los sentidos en el que se puede explorar un laberinto de nubes, caminar en un jardín de hielo o  perderse en los ricos aromas de canela y caramelo que flotan en el aire. Bienvenidos al Circo de los sueños. Pero detrás de estas maravillosas escenas existe una feroz competencia —un duelo entre dos magos jóvenes, Celia y Marcos, que han sido entrenados desde la infancia para competir en un “juego”. Obligados a participar por sus caprichosos amos, sin que ellos lo sepan, éste es un juego en el que sólo uno puede sobrevivir y el circo no es más que el escenario para una extraordinaria batalla de imaginación y voluntad. A pesar de todo, Celia y Marco caen irremediablemente enamorados —un amor profundo y mágico que causa que las luces parpadeen y el ambiente se caliente con solo tocarse las manos. Pero sus amos siguen moviendo los hilos y el amor imprevisto de Celia y Marco les obliga a intervenir, dejando la vida de todos, desde los artistas a los espectadores, en gran peligro. Divertida, original y fascinante, El circo de la noche es una rica historia de amor que capta la imaginación y encanta los sentidos.

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  • The circus arrives without warning.

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  • Het circus arriveert onverwacht.

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  • Follow your dreams, Bailey, she says. Be they Harvard or something else entirely. No matter what that father of yours says, or how loudly he might say it. He forgets that he was someone's...

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  • Children are dragged away with promises that they may return the next evening, though the circus will not be there the next evening and later those children will feel slighted and betrayed.

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  • You are no longer quite certain which side of the fence is the dream.

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  • I do not like being left in the dark. I am not particularly fond of believing in impossible things.

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  • You're not destined or chosen, I wish I could tell you that you were if that would make it easier, but it's not true. You're in the right place at the right time, and you care enough to...

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  • You are no longer quite certain which side of the fence is a dream.

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  • Je weet niet langer helemaal zeker aan welke kant van het hek de droom zich bevindt.

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