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The Last Girlfriend on Earth

And Other Love Stories

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Paperback published by Back Bay Books (Little, Brown and Company)

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About This Book
"One of the funniest books you'll read this year."--Publishers Weekly

Love can be messy, painful, and even tragic. When seen through the eyes of Simon Rich it can also be hilarious.

In thirty short, sharp, ingenious stories, Rich conjures up some unforgettable romances: An unused prophylactic describes life inside a teenage boy's wallet; God juggles the demands of his needy girlfriend with the looming deadline for earth's creation; and a lovestruck Sherlock Holmes ignores all the clues that his girlfriend's been cheating on him.

As enchanting, sweet, and absurd as love itself, these stories are Simon Rich's Valentine to readers, an irresistible collection of delights. All that's missing is the heart-shaped box.
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"One of the funniest books you'll read this year."--Publishers Weekly

Love can be messy, painful, and even tragic. When seen through the eyes of Simon Rich it can also be hilarious.

In thirty short, sharp, ingenious stories, Rich conjures up some unforgettable romances: An unused prophylactic describes life inside a teenage boy's wallet; God juggles the demands of his needy girlfriend with the looming deadline for earth's creation; and a lovestruck Sherlock Holmes ignores all the clues that his girlfriend's been cheating on him.

As enchanting, sweet, and absurd as love itself, these stories are Simon Rich's Valentine to readers, an irresistible collection of delights. All that's missing is the heart-shaped box.
Product Details
Paperback (240 pages)
Published: January 14, 2014
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Imprint: Back Bay Books
ISBN: 9780316219389
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