Search-icon

The Factory of Facts

By

Paperback published by Vintage (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

have you read it? rate it!
Histogram_reset_icon
(1 REVIEW)
ADD TO MY SHELF
About This Book
The acclaimed author of Low Life reinvents the memoir in a cunning, lyrical book that is at once a personal history and a meditation on the construction of identity.

Born in Belgium but raised in New Jersey, Luc Sante transformed himself from a pious, timid Belgian boy into a loutish American adolescent, who eschewed French while fantasizing about the pop star Françoise Hardy. To show how this transformation came about--and why it remained incomplete--The Factory of Facts  combines family anecdote and ancestral legend; detailed forays into Belgian history, language, and religion; and deft synopses of the American character.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Show less
The acclaimed author of Low Life reinvents the memoir in a cunning, lyrical book that is at once a personal history and a meditation on the construction of identity.

Born in Belgium but raised in New Jersey, Luc Sante transformed himself from a pious, timid Belgian boy into a loutish American adolescent, who eschewed French while fantasizing about the pop star Françoise Hardy. To show how this transformation came about--and why it remained incomplete--The Factory of Facts  combines family anecdote and ancestral legend; detailed forays into Belgian history, language, and religion; and deft synopses of the American character.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Product Details
Paperback (320 pages)
Published: March 30, 1999
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679746508
Other books byLuc Sante
  • The Count of Monte Cristo

    The Count of Monte Cristo
    Campfire Classics Line
    When Edmond Dantès is imprisoned for a crime he didn't commit, he vows to escape and destroy those who betrayed him. With his former life a distant memory, revenge drives him forward. Using the fortune left to him by Abbé Faria, he transforms himself into the powerful and enigmatic Count of Monte Cristo, and systematically hunts down the men who put him behind bars. Acting as destiny's agent, Dantès must face not only his enemies, but also the moral dilemmas raised by his ruthless quest for justice. With skill and mercilessness, he manipulates those around him to do his bidding, leaving a trail of social carnage in his wake. Can the man who once had so much to live for, complete his mission and find peace, or will fate thwart his plan at the very last?

    Maggie, a Girl of the Streets and Other New York Writings

    Maggie, a Girl of the Streets and Other New York Writings
    This harrowing tale of a young girl in the slums is a searing portrayal of turn-of-the-century New York, and Stephen Crane's most innovative work. Published in 1893, when the author was just twenty-one, it broke new ground with its vivid characters, its brutal naturalism, and its empathic rendering of the lives of the poor. It remains both powerful, severe, and harshly comic (in Alfred Kazin's words) and a masterpiece of modern American prose. This edition includes Maggie and George's Mother, Crane's other Bowery tales, and the most comprehensive available selection of Crane's New York journalism. All texts in this volume are presented in their definitive versions.

    Classic Crimes

    Classic Crimes
    Dorothy Sayers called William Roughead "the best showman who ever stood before the door of the chamber of horrors," and his true crime stories, written in the early 1900s, are among the glories of the genre. Displaying a meticulous command of evidence and unerring dramatic flair, Roughead brings to life some of the most notorious crimes and extraordinary trials of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England and Scotland. Utterly engrossing, these accounts of pre-meditated mayhem and miscarried justice also cast a powerful light on the evil that human beings, and human institutions, find both tempting to contemplate and all too easy to do.

    The Tumultuous Fifties

    The Tumultuous Fifties
    A View from the New York Times Photo Archives

Favorite QuotesFROM THIS BOOK
Quote Cannot be Empty

Submitted quotes are usually posted within 48 hours

ThanksYour Quote Will be posted Shortly
Bookish