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The Captive Mind

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Paperback published by Vintage (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book
The best known prose work by the winner of the 1980 Nobel Prize for Literature examines the moral and intellectual conflicts faced by men and women living under totalitarianism of the left or right.
Examines the moral and intellectual conflicts faced by men and women living under totalitarianism of the left or right.
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The best known prose work by the winner of the 1980 Nobel Prize for Literature examines the moral and intellectual conflicts faced by men and women living under totalitarianism of the left or right.
Examines the moral and intellectual conflicts faced by men and women living under totalitarianism of the left or right.
Product Details
Paperback (272 pages)
Published: August 11, 1990
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679728566
Other books byCzeslaw Milosz
  • A Book of Luminous Things

    A Book of Luminous Things
    An International Anthology of Poetry
    "A collection of 300 poems from writers around the world, selected and edited by Nobel laureate Czeslaw Milosz   Czesław Miłosz's A Book of Luminous Things—his personal selection of poems from the past and present—is a testament to the stunning varieties of human experience, offered up so that we may see the myriad ways that experience can be shared in words and images. Miłosz provides a preface to each of these poems, divided into thematic (and often beguiling) sections, such as “Travel,” “History,” and “The Secret of a Thing,” that make the reading as instructional as it is inspirational and remind us how powerfully poetry can touch our minds and hearts. "

    Visions from San Francisco Bay

    Visions from San Francisco Bay
    Interrelated essays by the Nobel Laureate on his adopted home of California, which Lewis Hyde, writing in The Nation, called "remarkable, morally serious and thought-provoking essays, which strive to lay aside the barren categories by which we have understood and judged our state . . . Their subject is the frailty of modern civilization."

    Czeslaw Milosz

    Czeslaw Milosz
    Conversations
    Czesław Miłosz (1911-2004) felt that part of his role as a poet and critic was to bear witness to bloodshed and terror as well as to beauty. He survived the Soviet invasion of his beloved Lithuania, escaped to Nazi-occupied Warsaw where he joined the Socialist resistance, then witnessed the Holocaust and the razing of the Warsaw Ghetto. After persecution and censorship triggered his defection in 1951, he found not relief but the anguish of solitude and obscurity. In the years of loneliness and labor, Miłosz continued writing poems and essays, learning to love his privacy and preoccupations and enjoying the devotion of his students at the University of California, Berkeley. International fame came like lightning when Miłosz won the 1980 Nobel Prize for Literature. Czesław Miłosz: Conversationscollects pieces from a wide range of sources over twenty-five years and includes an unpublished interview between Miłosz and his friend and fellow Nobel Laureate poet Joseph Brodsky. This volume acquaints us with a man whose work, life, and thought defy easy characterization. He is a sensualist with a scholar's penchant for history, as likely to celebrate Heraclitus as the hooks on a woman's corset. He is a devout but doubting Catholic, and a thinker tinged with a heretical sensibility. Cynthia L. Haven is a literary critic for theSan Francisco Chronicleand a regular contributor to theWashington Post Book World, theTimes Literary Supplement, and theLos Angeles Times Book Review. Her work also has been published inCivilization, theGeorgia Review, theKenyon Review, and theCortland Review.

Favorite QuotesFROM THIS BOOK
  • It was only towards the middle of the twentieth century that the inhabitants of many European countries came, in general unpleasantly, to the realization that their fate could be...

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  • Capitalism created scientific thinking and dealt a powerful blow to religion in Europe by removing the best minds from the confines of theology.

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  • They stammer out their efforts to explain: "The dreadful sadness of life over there"; "I felt I was turning into a machine."

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  • Naked fear is unlikely ever to be inclined to abdicate.

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  • One must always keep in mind the eventual goal, which is the melting down of all nations into a single mass.

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  • I think they are wrong, that their knowledge in all its perfection is insufficient, and their power over life and death is usurped.

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  • And perhaps Zeus, who does not call stamp-collectors and tulip-growers silly, will forgive.

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