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The Boys of '67

Charlie Company's War in Vietnam

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Paperback published by Osprey Publishing (Osprey Publishing)

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When the 160 men of Charlie Company (4th Battalion/47th Infantry/9th ID) were drafted by the US Army in May 1966, they were part of the wave of conscription that would swell the American military to 80,000 combat troops in theater by the height of the war in 1968. In the spring of 1966, the war was still popular and the draftees of Charlie Company saw their service as a rite of passage. But by December 1967, when the company rotated home, only 30 men were not casualties—and they were among the first vets of the war to be spit on and harassed by war protestors as they arrived back the U.S.
 
In his new book, The Boys of ’67, Andy Wiest, the award-winning author of Vietnam’s Forgotten Army and The Vietnam War 1956-1975, examines the experiences of a company from the only division in the Vietnam era to train and deploy together in similar fashion to WWII’s famous 101st Airborne Division.
 
Wiest interviewed more than 50 officers and enlisted men who served with Charlie Company, including the surviving platoon leaders and both of the company’s commanders. (One of the platoon leaders, Lt Jack Benedick, lost both of his legs, but went on to become a champion skier.) In addition, he interviewed 15 family members of Charlie Company veterans, including wives, children, parents, and siblings. Wiest also had access to personal papers, collections of letters, a diary, an abundance of newspaper clippings, training notebooks, field manuals, condolence letters, and photographs from before, during, and after the conflict.
 
As Wiest shows, the fighting that Charlie Company saw in 1967 was nearly as bloody as many of the better publicized battles, including the infamous ‘Ia Drang’ and ‘Hamburger Hill.’ As a result, many of the surviving members of Charlie Company came home with what the military now recognizes as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder—a diagnosis that was not recognized until the late 1970s and was not widely treated until the 1980s. Only recently, after more than 40 years, have many members of Charlie Company achieved any real and sustained relief from their suffering. 

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When the 160 men of Charlie Company (4th Battalion/47th Infantry/9th ID) were drafted by the US Army in May 1966, they were part of the wave of conscription that would swell the American military to 80,000 combat troops in theater by the height of the war in 1968. In the spring of 1966, the war was still popular and the draftees of Charlie Company saw their service as a rite of passage. But by December 1967, when the company rotated home, only 30 men were not casualties—and they were among the first vets of the war to be spit on and harassed by war protestors as they arrived back the U.S.
 
In his new book, The Boys of ’67, Andy Wiest, the award-winning author of Vietnam’s Forgotten Army and The Vietnam War 1956-1975, examines the experiences of a company from the only division in the Vietnam era to train and deploy together in similar fashion to WWII’s famous 101st Airborne Division.
 
Wiest interviewed more than 50 officers and enlisted men who served with Charlie Company, including the surviving platoon leaders and both of the company’s commanders. (One of the platoon leaders, Lt Jack Benedick, lost both of his legs, but went on to become a champion skier.) In addition, he interviewed 15 family members of Charlie Company veterans, including wives, children, parents, and siblings. Wiest also had access to personal papers, collections of letters, a diary, an abundance of newspaper clippings, training notebooks, field manuals, condolence letters, and photographs from before, during, and after the conflict.
 
As Wiest shows, the fighting that Charlie Company saw in 1967 was nearly as bloody as many of the better publicized battles, including the infamous ‘Ia Drang’ and ‘Hamburger Hill.’ As a result, many of the surviving members of Charlie Company came home with what the military now recognizes as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder—a diagnosis that was not recognized until the late 1970s and was not widely treated until the 1980s. Only recently, after more than 40 years, have many members of Charlie Company achieved any real and sustained relief from their suffering. 

Product Details
Paperback (448 pages)
Published: January 21, 2014
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
Imprint: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781472803337
Other books byAndrew Wiest
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    The Boys of '67

    The Boys of '67
    Charlie Company’s War in Vietnam
    When the 160 men of Charlie Company (4th Battalion/47thInfantry Regiment/9th Infantry Division) were drafted by the US Army in May 1966, they were part of thewave of conscription that would swell the American military to eighty thousandcombat troops in Vietnam by the height of the war in 1968. In the spring of1966 the war was still popular, and the draftees of Charlie Company saw theirservice as a rite of passage. But by December 1967, when the company returned home, only thirty men were not casualties--and they were among the first veterans ofthe war to be spit on and harassed by war protesters as they arrived back home.In The Boys of '67, Andrew Wiest, the award-winningauthor of Vietnam's Forgotten Army and The Vietnam War 1956-1975,examines the experiences of a company from the only division in the Vietnam erato train and deploy together in similar fashion to World War II's famous 101stAirborne Division.Wiest interviewed more than fifty officers and enlisted menwho served with Charlie Company, including the surviving platoon leaders andboth of the company's commanders. In addition, he interviewed fifteen familymembers of Charlie Company veterans, including wives, children, parents, andsiblings. Wiest also had access to personal papers, collections of letters, adiary, an abundance of newspaper clippings, training notebooks, field manuals,condolence letters, and photographs from before, during, and after theconflict.As Wiest shows, the fighting that Charlie Company saw in1967 was nearly as bloody as many of the better publicized battles, includingthe infamous battles of the Ia Drang Valley and Hamburger Hill. As a result, many of thesurviving members of Charlie Company came home with what the military nowrecognizes as post-traumatic stress disorder--a diagnosis that was notrecognized until the late 1970s and was not widely treated until the 1980s. Onlyrecently, after more than forty years, have many members of Charlie Companyachieved any real and sustained relief from their suffering.

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