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The Bhagavad-Gita

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eBook published by Bantam Classics (Random House Publishing Group)

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A vivid new translation of the jewel of Hindu spirituality

ONE OF THE GLORIES of Sanskrit poetry, The Bhagavad Gita is the ancient spiritual text that forms a sublime synthesis of the many strands of Hindu belief. Taken from the Mahabharata epic, it details a dialogue between the divine Krishna and the human warrior Arjuna before a mighty battle in which Arjuna must decide whether to wage war against his own family. Krishna imparts spiritual enlightenment to Arjuna, teaching him the paths of knowledge, devotion, action, and meditation, and helping him to see beyond the temporal to the eternal. This new translation captures both the clarity of Hindu philosophy and the beauty of Sanskrit poetry.

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A vivid new translation of the jewel of Hindu spirituality

ONE OF THE GLORIES of Sanskrit poetry, The Bhagavad Gita is the ancient spiritual text that forms a sublime synthesis of the many strands of Hindu belief. Taken from the Mahabharata epic, it details a dialogue between the divine Krishna and the human warrior Arjuna before a mighty battle in which Arjuna must decide whether to wage war against his own family. Krishna imparts spiritual enlightenment to Arjuna, teaching him the paths of knowledge, devotion, action, and meditation, and helping him to see beyond the temporal to the eternal. This new translation captures both the clarity of Hindu philosophy and the beauty of Sanskrit poetry.

Product Details
eBook
Published: June 1, 2004
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Imprint: Bantam Classics
ISBN: 9780553900392
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  • Introduction: Bhagavad-gita is also known as Gitopanisad.

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  • Thus end the Bhaktivedanta purports to the Eighteenth Chapter of the Srimad Bhagavad-gita in the matter of its conclusion and the Perfection of Renunciation.

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