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The Australian Army in World War II

By , (Illustrator)

Paperback published by Osprey Publishing (Osprey Publishing)

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About This Book
Osprey's examination of the Australian army and its involvement in World War II (1939-1945). The Australian infantry were amongst the Commonwealth's toughest and most widely traveled infantry, serving in campaigns including Syria, Greece, Cyprus, Crete, Libya, Egypt, New Guinea, and the South West Pacific. Their fearsome fighting reputation was earned first against the Afrika Corps in the Libyan Desert, and then in the hellish conditions of New Guinea, where they held out against the Japanese invasion.

Written by a leading expert on the subject and coupled with previously unpublished photographs from private collections and specially commissioned artwork, this book gives a comprehensive overview of the organization, units, uniforms, and insignia of the Australian "Diggers."
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Osprey's examination of the Australian army and its involvement in World War II (1939-1945). The Australian infantry were amongst the Commonwealth's toughest and most widely traveled infantry, serving in campaigns including Syria, Greece, Cyprus, Crete, Libya, Egypt, New Guinea, and the South West Pacific. Their fearsome fighting reputation was earned first against the Afrika Corps in the Libyan Desert, and then in the hellish conditions of New Guinea, where they held out against the Japanese invasion.

Written by a leading expert on the subject and coupled with previously unpublished photographs from private collections and specially commissioned artwork, this book gives a comprehensive overview of the organization, units, uniforms, and insignia of the Australian "Diggers."
Product Details
Paperback (64 pages)
Published: June 19, 2007
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
Imprint: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781846031236
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