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Sand County Almanac

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Paperback published by Ballantine Books (Random House Publishing Group)

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About This Book
"We can place this book on the shelf that holds the writings of Thoreau and John Muir." San Francisco Chronicle

These astonishing portraits of the natural world explore the breathtaking diversity of the unspoiled American landscape -- the mountains and the prairies, the deserts and the coastlines. A stunning tribute to our land and a bold challenge to protect the world we love.
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"We can place this book on the shelf that holds the writings of Thoreau and John Muir." San Francisco Chronicle

These astonishing portraits of the natural world explore the breathtaking diversity of the unspoiled American landscape -- the mountains and the prairies, the deserts and the coastlines. A stunning tribute to our land and a bold challenge to protect the world we love.
Product Details
Paperback (320 pages)
Published: December 12, 1986
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Imprint: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 9780345345059
Other books byAldo Leopold
  • A Sand County Almanac

    A Sand County Almanac
    Approaches the prevalent issues in ecology from an aesthetic viewpoint, stressing the beauty and balance of nature and the importance of its preservation.

    For the Health of the Land

    For the Health of the Land
    Previously Unpublished Essays and Other Writings

    Game Management

    Game Management
    With this book, published more than a half-century ago, Aldo Leopold created the discipline of wildlife management. AlthoughA Sand Country Almanacis doubtless Leopold’s most popular book,Game Managementmay well be his most important. In this book he revolutionized the field of conservation.

    Round River

    Round River
    To those who know the charm of Aldo Leopold's writing inA Sand County Almanac, this collection from his journals and essays will be a new delight. The journal entries included here were written in camp during his many field trips--hunting, fishing, and exploring--and they indicate the source of ideas on land ethics found in his longer essays. They reflect as well two long canoe trips in Canada and a sojourn in Mexico, where Leopold hunted deer with bow and arrow. The essays presented here are culled from the more contemplative notes which were still in manuscript form at the time of Leopold's death in 1948, fighting a brush fire on a neighbor's farm. Round Riverhas been edited by Leopold's son, Luna, a geologist well-known in the field of conservation. It is also charmingly illustrated with line drawings by Charles W. Schwartz. All admirers of Leopold's work--indeed, all lovers of nature--will find this book richly rewarding.

Favorite QuotesFROM THIS BOOK
  • There are some who can live without wild things, and some who cannot. (Forward)

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  • Each year, after the midwinter blizzards, there comes a night of thaw, when the tinkle of dripping water is heard in the land.

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  • To me an ancient cottonwood is the greatest of trees because in his youth he shaded the buffalo and wore a halo of pigeons, and I like a young cottonwood because he may some day become...

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  • But all conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.

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  • To see America as history, to conceive of destiny as a becoming, to smell a hickory tree through the lapse of ages--all these things are possible for us, and to achieve them takes only...

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  • Despite several opportunities to do so, I have never returned to the White Mountains. I prefer not to see what tourists, roads, sawmills, and logging railroads have done for it, or to...

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  • It is a century now since Darwin gave us the first glimpse of the origin of the species. We know now what was unknown to all the preceding caravan of generations: that men are only...

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  • ...Thoreau's dictum 'In wildness is the salvation of the world.'

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  • A professor may pluck the strings of his own instrument, but never that of another, and if he listens for music he must never admit it to his fellows or to his students. For all are...

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  • Science contributes moral as well as material blessings to the world. Its great moral contribution is objectivity, or the scientific point of view. This means doubting everything except...

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  • This thumbnail sketch of land as an energy circuit conveys three basic ideas: that land is not merely soil, that the native plants and animals kept the energy circuit open; others may or...

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  • Recreational development is a job not of building roads into lovely country, but of building receptivity into the still unlovely human mind.

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