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Picnic

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About This Book
This title collects four plays by American playwright William Inge, including Come Back Little Sheba, Picnic, Bus Stop, and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs.
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This title collects four plays by American playwright William Inge, including Come Back Little Sheba, Picnic, Bus Stop, and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs.
Product Details
eBook (72 pages)
Published: April 3, 2013
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Imprint: Random House
ISBN: 9780307829399
Other books byWilliam Inge
  • Bus Stop

    Bus Stop
    Upon hitting Broadway in 1955 Bus Stop was an immediate commercial & critical success. During a winter storm a busload of weary travelers are forced to shack up at a roadside diner until morning. Inge was renowned for his in-depth character studies, Bus Stop is no exception and offers a warm play about the intersecting lives of eight ordinary people.An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Megan Anderson, Terrence Currier, Rachel Miner, Anson Mount, Kyle Prue, Lynnie Raybuck, Jefferson A. Russell and Gary Sloan.

    Four Plays

    Four Plays
    Come Back Little Sheba; Picnic; Bus Stop; The...
    Beginning in 1950, William Inge achieved four consecutive Broadway successes with the plays in this volume, which gained even greater audiences as motion pictures. Come Back, Little Sheba concerns itself with the near-tragic crisis in the lives of an alcoholic and his wife; Picnic deals with the effects of the arrival of a vagabond on a group of women in a small Kansas town; Bus Stop centers on a group of people stranded in a small café; The Dark at the Top of the Stairs presents a somber picture of a family haunted by unfocused fears and prejudices. Includes: 'Come Back, Little Sheba' 'Picnic' 'Bus Stop' 'The Dark at the Top of the Stairs'

    Splendor in the Grass

    Splendor in the Grass
    THE STORY: Good looking, a star athlete, and son of the richest man in town, Bud Stamper is the prize catch in his high-school class, and Deanie Loomis is the girl lucky enough to get him. But both Bud and Deanie are disturbed by the powerful feelings that have grown between them, which are turned into torture by the restraints of proper conduct. Mindful of the bad example of his own debauched sister, Bud wants to marry Deanie immediately and go to agricultural school—a hope that is destroyed by his father's ambitions to put Bud through Yale and into the family oil business. Bud and Deanie promise to wait, and Bud decides that it is better for them to see less of each other in the meantime, a turn of events that plunges the unstable Deanie into an emotional crack-up and then commitment to an institution. By the time she is released their world has turned over. The stock market crash has destroyed the Stamper empire and led to suicide for Bud's father; Bud has left Yale and married a young waitress from New Haven; and Deanie has become engaged to a young man she met in the hospital. The time has come for both to start life anew, but to do this means to come to terms with the past, and this Bud and Deanie do in a final, touching scene where old ties are gently broken, and each gains the sureness and strength to move on from disturbing memories to better hopes for what lies ahead.

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