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New Grub Street

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Paperback published by Modern Library (Random House Publishing Group)

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About This Book
In New Grub Street George Gissing re-created a microcosm of London's literary society as he had experienced it. His novel is at once a major social document and a story that draws us irresistibly into the twilit world of Edwin Reardon, a struggling novelist, and his friends and acquaintances in Grub Street including Jasper Milvain, an ambitious journalist, and Alfred Yule, an embittered critic. Here Gissing brings to life the bitter battles (fought out in obscure garrets or in the Reading Room of the British Museum) between integrity and the dictates of the market place, the miseries of genteel poverty and the damage that failure and hardship do to human personality and relationships.
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In New Grub Street George Gissing re-created a microcosm of London's literary society as he had experienced it. His novel is at once a major social document and a story that draws us irresistibly into the twilit world of Edwin Reardon, a struggling novelist, and his friends and acquaintances in Grub Street including Jasper Milvain, an ambitious journalist, and Alfred Yule, an embittered critic. Here Gissing brings to life the bitter battles (fought out in obscure garrets or in the Reading Room of the British Museum) between integrity and the dictates of the market place, the miseries of genteel poverty and the damage that failure and hardship do to human personality and relationships.
Product Details
Paperback (544 pages)
Published: November 12, 2002
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Imprint: Modern Library
ISBN: 9780375761102
Other books byGeorge Gissing
  • The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft

    The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft
    Webster's edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to "difficult, yet commonly used" words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in French, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English, and avoid using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having the reader decipher a word's meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. If a difficult word is not translated on a page, chances are that it has been translated on a previous page.

    The Odd Women

    The Odd Women
    Virginia and Alice Madden are ‘odd women’, growing old alone in Victorian England with no prospect of finding love. Forced into poverty by the sudden death of their father, they lead lives of quiet desperation in a genteel boarding house in London. Meanwhile, their younger sister Monica, struggles to endure a loveless marriage she agreed to as her only escape from spinsterhood. But when the Maddens meet an old friend, Rhoda Nunn, they are soon made aware of the depth of their oppression. Astonishingly ahead of its time, The Odd Women is a pioneering work of early feminism. Gissing's depiction of the daring feminist Rhoda Nunn, it is an unflinching portrayal of one woman’s struggle to reconcile her own desires with her deepest principles.

    Eve's Ransom

    Eve's Ransom
    One of the foremost fiction writers in the genre of Victorian realism, George Gissing wrote several of the most notable novels of the era, including New Grub Street and Born in Exile. The short novel Eve's Ransom is a classic story of misbegotten love wherein an impressionable young man falls for -- and attempts desperately to win over -- a woman who appears to be all wrong for him.

    The Crown of Life

    The Crown of Life
    Critics regard George Gissing as one of the most important writers of the Victorian era. Over the course of his career, he emerged as one of the most significant innovators in the literary genre of realism. In The Crown of Life, one of his later works, Gissing explores human relationships, and in particular, marriage, with the keen eye for detail and piercing insight that are his hallmarks.

Favorite QuotesFROM THIS BOOK
  • As the Milvains sat down to breakfast the clock of Wattleborough parish church struck eight; it was two miles away, but the strokes were borne very distinctly on the west wind this autumn...

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  • ... at one-and-twenty he [John Yule] obtained a clerk's place in the office of a London newspaper. Three years after, his father died, and the small patrimony which fell to him he used...

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  • So Amy first played and then sang, and Jasper lay back in dreamy bliss.

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