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Man's Search for Meaning

By , (Contributor), William J. Winslade (Contributor)

eBook published by Beacon Press (Beacon Press)

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About This Book
Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.

At the time of Frankl's death in 1997, Man's Search for Meaning had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a "book that made a difference in your life" found Man's Search for Meaning among the ten most influential books in America.

Beacon Press, the original English-language publisher of Man's Search for Meaning, is issuing this new paperback edition with a new Foreword, biographical Afterword, jacket, price, and classroom materials to reach new generations of readers.
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Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.

At the time of Frankl's death in 1997, Man's Search for Meaning had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a "book that made a difference in your life" found Man's Search for Meaning among the ten most influential books in America.

Beacon Press, the original English-language publisher of Man's Search for Meaning, is issuing this new paperback edition with a new Foreword, biographical Afterword, jacket, price, and classroom materials to reach new generations of readers.
Product Details
eBook
Published: June 1, 2006
Publisher: Beacon Press
Imprint: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807014288
Other books byViktor E. Frankl
  • The Will to Meaning

    The Will to Meaning
    Foundations and Applications of Logotherapy
    Holocaust survivor Viktor E. Frankl converted the horrors he experienced in a German concentration camp into the pioneering philosophy he called logotherapy. Unlike Freud’s “will to pleasure” and Adler’s “will to power,” Frankl based logotherapy on three things: the freedom of will, the will to meaning, and the meaning of life. By presenting three methodological concepts, Frankl shows how we can all reinvigorate our experiences and tie them to will and power. Originally published in 1988 and compiling Frankl’s speeches on logotherapy, The Will to Meaning is regarded as a seminal work of behavior therapy.

    The Unheard Cry for Meaning

    The Unheard Cry for Meaning
    Psychotherapy and Humanism
    A Touchstone ebook.

    The Doctor and the Soul

    The Doctor and the Soul
    From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy
    Emphasizing spiritual values and the quest for meaning in life in its approach to the neurotic behavior, by the founder of logotherapy.

    Father, Have I Kept My Promise?

    Father, Have I Kept My Promise?
    Madness as Seen from Within
    In 1937 Edith had received a doctorate in psychology from the University of Vienna, and high recommendations from her famous teachers. Her career prospects looked bright indeed. But a year later, she was a refugee from Hitler's war on Jews. She left her Nazi-occupied homeland and immigrated to the United States in 1939. In the United States, she pursued her career in psychology as a professor at prominent universities as well as a clinical consultant for the State of Indiana. As a psychology professor at Purdue, she contracted tuberculosis and spent 1962-64 in a tuberculosis hospital. Before she was released, she began to experience instances of schizophrenia. In this condition, she taught at St. Mary-of the-Woods College in Terre Haute, Indiana, for a year. Just before her stay there was to end, a priest discovered her mental illness. All through her mental illness, she kept a diary chronicling her "schizophrenic episode." Father, Have I Kept My Promise? is that diary-turned-book. Part of the book's charm is Edith's honesty--she does not bide anything from her reader.

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  • This book does not claim to be an account of facts and events but of personal experiences, experiences which millions of prisoners have suffered time and again.

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  • Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.

    — submitted by Marjorie CunninghamFlag This Quote For Review
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