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Paperback published by Bantam Classics (Random House Publishing Group)

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About This Book
"This is America--a town of a few thousand, in a region of wheat and corn and dairies and little groves." So Sinclair Lewis--recipient of the Nobel Prize and rejecter of the Pulitzer--prefaces his novel "Main Street". Lewis is brutal in his depictions of the self-satisfied inhabitants of small-town America, a place which proves to be merely an assemblage of pretty surfaces, strung together and ultimately empty.
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"This is America--a town of a few thousand, in a region of wheat and corn and dairies and little groves." So Sinclair Lewis--recipient of the Nobel Prize and rejecter of the Pulitzer--prefaces his novel "Main Street". Lewis is brutal in his depictions of the self-satisfied inhabitants of small-town America, a place which proves to be merely an assemblage of pretty surfaces, strung together and ultimately empty.
Product Details
Paperback (624 pages)
Published: March 1, 1996
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Imprint: Bantam Classics
ISBN: 9780553214512
Other books bySinclair Lewis
  • Babbitt

    Babbitt
    Since the 1922 publication of Babbitt, its eponymous anti-hero-a real estate broker and relentless social climber inhabiting a Midwestern town called Zenith-has become a symbol of stultifying values and middle class hypocrisy.

    Arrowsmith

    Arrowsmith
    Lewis's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel recounts the story of a doctor who becomes an isolated seeker of scientific truth after he is forced to give up his trade for reasons ranging from public ignorance to the publicity-mindedness of a great foundation. Revised reissue.

    Dodsworth

    Dodsworth
    Meet Sam Dodsworth, an amiable fifty-year-old millionaire and American Captain of Industry, believing in the Republican Party, high tariffs, and, so long as they did not annoy him personally, in Prohibition and the Episcopal Church. Dodsworth runs an auto manufacturing firm, but his beautiful wife Fran, obsessed with the notion that she is growing old, persuades him to sell his interest in the company and take her to Europe. He agrees for the sake of their marriage, but before long, the pretensions of the cosmopolitan scene prove more enticing to Fran than her husband.Both a devastating, surprisingly contemporary portrait of a marriage falling apart and a grand tour of the Europe of a bygone era, Dodsworth is stamped with Sinclair Lewis' signature satire, wickedly observant of America's foibles, and great fun.

    It Can't Happen Here

    It Can't Happen Here
    It Can’t Happen Here is the only one of Sinclair Lewis’s later novels to match the power of Main Street, Babbitt, and Arrowsmith. A cautionary tale about the fragility of democracy, it is an alarming, eerily timeless look at how fascism could take hold in America. Written during the Great Depression, when the country was largely oblivious to Hitler’s aggression, it juxtaposes sharp political satire with the chillingly realistic rise of a president who becomes a dictator to save the nation from welfare cheats, sex, crime, and a liberal press. Called “a message to thinking Americans” by the Springfield Republican when it was published in 1935, It Can’t Happen Here is a shockingly prescient novel that remains as fresh and contemporary as today’s news. With an Introduction by Michael Meyer and a New Afterword

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  • On a hill by the Mississippi where Chippewas camped two generations ago, a girl stood in relief against the cornflower blue of Northern sky...

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