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Madness and Civilization

A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason

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Paperback published by Vintage (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book
Perhaps the French philosopher's masterpiece, which is concerned with an extraordinary question: What does it mean to be mad?
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Perhaps the French philosopher's masterpiece, which is concerned with an extraordinary question: What does it mean to be mad?
Product Details
Paperback (320 pages)
Published: November 28, 1988
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679721109
Other books byMichel Foucault
  • The Order of Things

    The Order of Things
    An Archaeology of Human Sciences
    Possibly one off the most significant, yet most overlooked, works of the twentieth century, it was The Order of Things that established Foucault's reputation as an intellectual giant.

    The Birth of the Clinic

    The Birth of the Clinic
    An Archaeology of Medical Perception
    In the eighteenth century, medicine underwent a mutation. For the first time, medical knowledge took on a precision that had formerly belonged only to mathematics. The body became something that could be mapped. Disease became subject to new rules of classification. And doctors begin to describe phenomena that for centuries had remained below the threshold of the visible and expressible. In The Birth of the Clinic the philosopher and intellectual historian who may be the true heir to Nietzsche charts this dramatic transformation of medical knowledge. As in his classic Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault shows how much what we think of as pure science owes to social and cultural attitudes -- in this case, to the climate of the French Revolution. Brilliant, provocative, and omnivorously learned, his book sheds new light on the origins of our current notions of health and sickness, life and death.

    The Government of Self and Others

    The Government of Self and Others
    Lectures at the College de France, 1982-1983
    This lecture, given by Michel Foucault at the Collège de France, launches an inquiry into the notion of parresia and continues his rereading of ancient philosophy. Through the study of this notion of truth-telling, of speaking out freely, Foucault re-examines Greek citizenship, showing how the courage of the truth forms the forgotten ethical basis of Athenian democracy. The figure of the philosopher king, the condemnation of writing, and Socrates’ rejection of political involvement are some of the many topics of ancient philosophy revisited here.

    The Archaeology of Knowledge

    The Archaeology of Knowledge
    Foucault's classic methodological statement.

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