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Kipling: Poems

By , (Editor)

Hardcover published by Everyman's Library (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book
Beloved for his fanciful and engrossing children’s literature, controversial for his enthusiasm for British imperialism, Rudyard Kipling remains one of the most widely read writers of Victorian and modern English literature. In addition to writing more than two dozen works of fiction, including Kim and The Jungle Book, Kipling was a prolific poet, composing verse in every classical form from the epigram to the ode. Kipling’s most distinctive gift was for ballads and narrative poems in which he drew vivid characters in universal situations, articulating profound truths in plain language. Yet he was also a subtle, affecting anatomist of the human heart, and his deep feeling for the natural world was exquisitely expressed in his verse. He was shattered by World War I, in which he lost his only son, and his work darkened in later years but never lost its extraordinary vitality. All of these aspects of Kipling’s poetry are represented in this selection, which ranges from such well-known compositions as “Mandalay” and “If” to the less-familiar, emotionally powerful, and personal epigrams he wrote in response to the war.
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Beloved for his fanciful and engrossing children’s literature, controversial for his enthusiasm for British imperialism, Rudyard Kipling remains one of the most widely read writers of Victorian and modern English literature. In addition to writing more than two dozen works of fiction, including Kim and The Jungle Book, Kipling was a prolific poet, composing verse in every classical form from the epigram to the ode. Kipling’s most distinctive gift was for ballads and narrative poems in which he drew vivid characters in universal situations, articulating profound truths in plain language. Yet he was also a subtle, affecting anatomist of the human heart, and his deep feeling for the natural world was exquisitely expressed in his verse. He was shattered by World War I, in which he lost his only son, and his work darkened in later years but never lost its extraordinary vitality. All of these aspects of Kipling’s poetry are represented in this selection, which ranges from such well-known compositions as “Mandalay” and “If” to the less-familiar, emotionally powerful, and personal epigrams he wrote in response to the war.
Product Details
Hardcover (256 pages)
Published: October 16, 2007
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Everyman's Library
ISBN: 9780307267115
Other books byRudyard Kipling
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    Kipling and the Sea
    Voyages and Discoveries from North Atlantic to...
     Kipling may be best known  as a commentator on the British Empire, but he was also a vivid observer and chronicler of the sea—and of ships and all who sailed in them. For him, the sea was the glue which bound the British Empire together. So Kipling wrote copiously about his own voyages—to India, across the Pacific and Atlantic, down to South Africa and Australia— and about the voyages of others. Sailors were particular heroes of his, as adventurers who braved every kind of element and danger in order to reach distant lands. In writing about them, he was enthralled by the romance of the sea, touching  on everything  from pirates to technical changes in ships. At all stages of his life Kipling  peppered his many letters with observations about the sea, encompassing  his own voyages and his other nautical interests. Newly edited and featuring a commentary by Kipling  expert and author of the much-praised Kipling Abroad, Kipling and the Sea illuminates a side of Kipling’s work that has not yet been fully explored.

    If

    If
    When Rudyard Kipling wrote the poem "If—" in 1909, he was addressing his 12-yearold son, John, who would die in battle a few short years later during World War I. The famous author's words soon inspired a nation, and the poem has twice been voted Great Britain's favorite. Italian illustrator Giovanni Manna melds the innocence of childhood with the encouraging sentiments expressed by Kipling's words in this tender portrayal of fatherly advice.

    The Jungle Book

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    Kim

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    The text—that of the 1901 Sussex Edition—is fully annotated and accompanied by three maps that help students place the novel in geographical and historical contexts. "Backgrounds" explores the novel's complicated issues of multiculturalism, imperialism, and racism, allowing readers to glimpse Kipling's personal thoughts about British expansionism.  Included are two short stories, poems, and letters by Kipling, as well as autobiographical and biographical memoirs and contemporary reviews of Kim. "Criticism" collects fourteen wide-ranging assessments of the novel by Noel Annan, Irving Howe, Edward Said, Ian Baucom, A. Michael Matin, John A. McClure, Anne Parry, Michael Hollington, Parama Roy, Sara Suleri, Patrick Williams, Suvir Kaul, Mark Kinkead-Weekes, and Zohreh T. Sullivan. A Chronology and a Selected Bibliography are included.

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