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Japanese Paratroop Forces of World War II

By , (Illustrator)

eBook published by Osprey Publishing (Osprey Publishing)

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About This Book
Osprey's examination of Japan's parachute units of World War II (1939-1945). For the first time in English, this book offers a concise but fact-packed account of the organization, equipment, and all operations of Japan's small but elite wartime parachute forces. Correcting and amplifying previous accounts based on wartime intelligence, it traces the Imperial Army's Raiding Regiments and the Imperial Navy's parachute-trained Yokosuka 1st & 3rd Special Naval Landing Forces from the first trials units, through their successful assaults in early 1942, to the last desperate battles and raids of 1944–45. The text is illustrated with rare photographs, and meticulously reconstructed color artwork of the men and their gear.
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Osprey's examination of Japan's parachute units of World War II (1939-1945). For the first time in English, this book offers a concise but fact-packed account of the organization, equipment, and all operations of Japan's small but elite wartime parachute forces. Correcting and amplifying previous accounts based on wartime intelligence, it traces the Imperial Army's Raiding Regiments and the Imperial Navy's parachute-trained Yokosuka 1st & 3rd Special Naval Landing Forces from the first trials units, through their successful assaults in early 1942, to the last desperate battles and raids of 1944–45. The text is illustrated with rare photographs, and meticulously reconstructed color artwork of the men and their gear.
Product Details
eBook (64 pages)
Published: September 18, 2012
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
Imprint: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781782004578
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