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Houses of snow, skin and bones

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Paperback published by Tundra Books (Tundra)

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About This Book
A look at the fascinating shelters that Native communities in the Far North built, using only materials their environment provided: snow, stone, sod, skin, bones, and any driftwood picked up along the shores. Black-and-white and color drawings show the tools used, and how the snow house, the quarmang, the Alaskan sod-house, and the tent or tupiq were built. And of course, there’s information on the classic snow igloo which could be constructed in a few hours for emergency shelter.
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A look at the fascinating shelters that Native communities in the Far North built, using only materials their environment provided: snow, stone, sod, skin, bones, and any driftwood picked up along the shores. Black-and-white and color drawings show the tools used, and how the snow house, the quarmang, the Alaskan sod-house, and the tent or tupiq were built. And of course, there’s information on the classic snow igloo which could be constructed in a few hours for emergency shelter.
Product Details
Paperback (24 pages)
Published: June 1, 1993
Publisher: Tundra
Imprint: Tundra Books
ISBN: 9780887763052
Other books byBonnie Shemie
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    Mounds of earth and shell
    Much of what we know of life among the inhabitants of North America before the arrival of Europeans comes from mounds in the southeastern U.S. However, there is much debate among scholars about the findings. Excavations show sophisticated cities, large effigy mounds, centers of worship, and possibly, vast earthwork calendars. Objects found in the mounds and burial sites provide graphic information about how these ancient people lived.

    Building Canada

    Building Canada
    Sitting so close to the United States, and with influences from France, Great Britain, Asia, and Europe, building styles in Canada are familiar but different, eclectic, and unique. Bonnie Shemie, who studied the houses of North America’s native peoples, has created a beautiful and informative volume that defines this country’s history and geography through its buildings. Among the styles that dot the landscape are Quebec’s maison Canadienne based on France’s peasant cottages, brightly painted homes of the Atlantic seaports, the sod houses, prefabricated buildings and false fronts that dominated the prairies, popular Ontario farm house design, Montreal’s famed duplexes with exterior staircases, and uniquely Canadian chateau-style hotels. Building Canada also looks at the importance of modern building materials, restoration efforts, and city planning. Complete with timeline and glossary.

    Houses of wood

    Houses of wood
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    Houses of adobe

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