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Hitman: Absolution

Prima Official Game Guide

By , (Author)

Paperback published by Prima Games (Random House Information Group)

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About This Book
• Engage or go undetected – Direct offensive and stealth based strategies provide multiple paths and options to fit your play style.
• Get the drop on enemies – Use the 'Instinct' ability or follow detailed maps to complete your objectives.
• Level Up – Discover the best Challenges and the easiest way to complete them.
• Max gamer score – Learn where and how to unlock all achievements/trophies.

Covers: Xbox 360®, Playstation®3, PC
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• Engage or go undetected – Direct offensive and stealth based strategies provide multiple paths and options to fit your play style.
• Get the drop on enemies – Use the 'Instinct' ability or follow detailed maps to complete your objectives.
• Level Up – Discover the best Challenges and the easiest way to complete them.
• Max gamer score – Learn where and how to unlock all achievements/trophies.

Covers: Xbox 360®, Playstation®3, PC
Product Details
Paperback (288 pages)
Published: November 20, 2012
Publisher: Random House Information Group
Imprint: Prima Games
ISBN: 9780307895103
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