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Gideon's Trumpet

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Paperback published by Vintage (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book
A history of the landmark case of James Earl Gideon's fight for the right to legal counsel. Notes, table of cases, index. The classic backlist bestseller. More than 800,000 sold since its first pub date of 1964.
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A history of the landmark case of James Earl Gideon's fight for the right to legal counsel. Notes, table of cases, index. The classic backlist bestseller. More than 800,000 sold since its first pub date of 1964.
Product Details
Paperback (288 pages)
Published: April 23, 1989
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679723127
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