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Frederick the Great's Army (2)

Infantry

By , (Illustrator)

eBook published by Osprey Publishing (Osprey Publishing)

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About This Book
Throughout the wars undertaken by Frederick the Great, probably his greatest resource was his infantry. It is a mark of the king's determination that despite wars which almost destroyed both Prussia and its army (such as the Seven Years' War), he was able to maintain its numbers – even if the quality declined as the attritional campaigns took their toll. Philip Haythornthwaite examines the uniforms, tactics and organisation of Frederick's infantry in detail – a fighting force that contested battles such as Mollwitz, Hohenfriedberg, Kesselsdorf, Liegnitz, Burkersdorf and the siege of Prague.
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Throughout the wars undertaken by Frederick the Great, probably his greatest resource was his infantry. It is a mark of the king's determination that despite wars which almost destroyed both Prussia and its army (such as the Seven Years' War), he was able to maintain its numbers – even if the quality declined as the attritional campaigns took their toll. Philip Haythornthwaite examines the uniforms, tactics and organisation of Frederick's infantry in detail – a fighting force that contested battles such as Mollwitz, Hohenfriedberg, Kesselsdorf, Liegnitz, Burkersdorf and the siege of Prague.
Product Details
eBook (48 pages)
Published: May 22, 2012
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
Imprint: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781780967615
Other books byPhilip Haythornthwaite
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