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British Railway Tickets

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eBook published by Shire (Osprey Publishing)

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About This Book
In 1838 Thomas Edmondson, an employee of the fledgling Newcastle & Carlisle Railway, revolutionized the ticket issuing process in Britain and left an enduring legacy: the Edmondson ticket. Purchased as proof of the contract between passenger and railway company, the ticket was a receipt, travel pass and an ephemeral record of almost every train journey ever taken in the British Isles, reflecting the nostalgia of the railways and a period of history when the movement of millions of people brought together England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The railways printed millions of tickets for every conceivable journey and category of passenger. Most were destroyed after use, but remarkably many survive, in the care of libraries, museums and collectors, and form the basis of a fascinating hobby.
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In 1838 Thomas Edmondson, an employee of the fledgling Newcastle & Carlisle Railway, revolutionized the ticket issuing process in Britain and left an enduring legacy: the Edmondson ticket. Purchased as proof of the contract between passenger and railway company, the ticket was a receipt, travel pass and an ephemeral record of almost every train journey ever taken in the British Isles, reflecting the nostalgia of the railways and a period of history when the movement of millions of people brought together England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The railways printed millions of tickets for every conceivable journey and category of passenger. Most were destroyed after use, but remarkably many survive, in the care of libraries, museums and collectors, and form the basis of a fascinating hobby.
Product Details
eBook (72 pages)
Published: February 19, 2013
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
Imprint: Shire
ISBN: 9780747813149
Other books byJan Dobrzynski
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