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Best Business Crime Writing of the Year

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eBook published by Anchor (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

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About This Book
A year ago it would have been difficult to conceive of an anthology of stories soley devoted to corporate malfeasance. Today, the challenge has been to keep it confined to one volume. From P.J. O’Rourke’s hilarious “How To Stuff A Wild Enron,” in which he compares trying to understand Enron’s finances to trying to buy an airline ticket at the best price, to Marc Peyser’s’s perceptive look at that American institution, Martha Stewart, to Joe Nocera’s investigation of how it all went wrong, the stories here are sometimes infuriating, often entertaining, and invariably informative. Best Business Crime Writing Of The Year is a report from the front lines of the war zone that has become American business today by some of our most talented and perceptive writers.

Includes:
• “The New Bull Market” by Michael Kinsley from Slate
• “In Praise of Corporate Corruption Boom” by Michael Lewis from Bloomberg News
“HardBall” by David McClintick from Forbes
“The Accountants’ War” by Jane Mayer from the New Yorker
“Enron Debacle Highlights the Trouble With Stock Options” by Thomas Stewart from Business 2.0
“Investigating ImClone” by Alex Prud’homme from Vanity Fair
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A year ago it would have been difficult to conceive of an anthology of stories soley devoted to corporate malfeasance. Today, the challenge has been to keep it confined to one volume. From P.J. O’Rourke’s hilarious “How To Stuff A Wild Enron,” in which he compares trying to understand Enron’s finances to trying to buy an airline ticket at the best price, to Marc Peyser’s’s perceptive look at that American institution, Martha Stewart, to Joe Nocera’s investigation of how it all went wrong, the stories here are sometimes infuriating, often entertaining, and invariably informative. Best Business Crime Writing Of The Year is a report from the front lines of the war zone that has become American business today by some of our most talented and perceptive writers.

Includes:
• “The New Bull Market” by Michael Kinsley from Slate
• “In Praise of Corporate Corruption Boom” by Michael Lewis from Bloomberg News
“HardBall” by David McClintick from Forbes
“The Accountants’ War” by Jane Mayer from the New Yorker
“Enron Debacle Highlights the Trouble With Stock Options” by Thomas Stewart from Business 2.0
“Investigating ImClone” by Alex Prud’homme from Vanity Fair
Product Details
eBook (272 pages)
Published: December 18, 2007
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Imprint: Anchor
ISBN: 9780307424952
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