Search-icon

Maurice Sendak

FIND MAURICE SENDAK ONLINE:
WEBSITEFACEBOOK
About This Author

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

Show less

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

Books by thisAuthor
  • Bumble-Ardy

    Bumble-Ardy
    Since the publication of his classic Outside Over There in 1981, Maurice Sendak’s book illustrations have focused on interpreting the texts of such authors as James Marshall, Tony Kushner, Wilhelm Grimm, Ruth Krauss, Herman Melville, and Mother Goose. And beginning in 1980, with his sets and costumes for The Magic Flute, Sendak launched a busy second career as the designer of stage productions of opera and ballet. Now comes Bumble-Ardy, the first book he has written as well as illustrated in thirty years. Bumble-Ardy has evolved from an animated segment for Sesame Street to a glorious picture book about a mischievous pig who reaches the age of nine without ever having a birthday party. But all that changes when Bumble-Ardy throws a party for himself and invites all his friends, leading to a wild masquerade that quickly gets out of hand. In this highly anticipated picture book, Sendak once again explores the exuberance of young children and the unshakable love between parent (in this case, an aunt) and child.

    We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy

    We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy
    We are all in the dumps For diamonds are thumps The kittens are gone to St. Paul's! The baby is bit The moon's in a fit And the houses are built Without walls Jack and Guy Went out in the Rye And they found a little boy With one black eye Come says Jack let's knock Him on the head No says Guy Let's buy him some bread You buy one loaf And I'll buy two And we'll bring him up As other folk do Two traditional rhymes from Mother Goose, ingeniously joined and interpreted by Maurice Sendak.

    Higglety Pigglety Pop! and Where the Wild Things Are

    Higglety Pigglety Pop! and Where the Wild Things Are

    Maurice Sendak's Really Rosie

    Maurice Sendak's Really Rosie
    This sturdily bound paperback contains the script of the TV special Really Rosie, the text of [the four Nutshell Library volumes], and music arranged for easy piano and guitar chords for the seven Carole King songs from [the program].A delight for TV fans of all ages.' 'Language Arts.

  • Very Far Away

    Very Far Away
    First published in 1957, Very Far Away is the second book Sendak both wrote and illustrated. In this story, a young boy with a new baby sibling, must learn to cope with his sudden lack of attention. He goes out searching for 'very far away'.

    My Brother's Book

    My Brother's Book
    Fifty years after Where the Wild Things Are was published comes the last book Maurice Sendak completed before his death in May 2012, My Brother's Book. With influences from Shakespeare and William Blake, Sendak pays homage to his late brother, Jack, whom he credited for his passion for writing and drawing. Pairing Sendak's poignant poetry with his exquisite and dramatic artwork, this book redefines what mature readers expect from Maurice Sendak while continuing the lasting legacy he created over his long, illustrious career. Sendak's tribute to his brother is an expression of both grief and love and will resonate with his lifelong fans who may have read his children's books and will be ecstatic to discover something for them now. Pulitzer Prize–winning literary critic and Shakespearean scholar Stephen Greenblatt contributes a moving introduction.

    Maurice Sendak's Christmas Mystery

    Maurice Sendak's Christmas Mystery
    Maurice Sendak's Christmas Mystery comes in an elegant gift box, festively decorated with Sendak art. Inside, you will find a charming little picture book, chockablock with visual clues to help you solve the mystery. You'll also find a jigsaw puzzle with 50 jumbo pieces. Put the puzzle together and the surprise solution to Sendak's merry Christmas mystery will be revealed in all its glory.

    In the Night Kitchen Coloring Book

    In the Night Kitchen Coloring Book
    Maurice Sendak's Caldecott Honor-winning book, In the Night Kitchen, is now available as a coloring book. The complete text and black and white illustrations are included, so children can color every page of the story.

  • Where the Wild Things Are CD

    Where the Wild Things Are CD
    In the Night Kitchen,Outside Over There,...
    Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are was published in 1963 to great critical acclaim. Brian O'Doherty of The New York Times said that Mr. Sendak's work, "disguised in fantasy, springs from his earliest self, from the vagrant child that lurks in the heart of all of us." Where the Wild Things Are is the first book in a trilogy that includes In the Night Kitchen, published in 1970, "a profoundly engaging fantasy that ought to become a classic" (The New York Times) and Outside Over There, published in 1981, which Newsweek called "extraordinary... triumphantly moving."

    The Light Princess

    The Light Princess
    The Light Princess--the princess who "lost her gravity"--has been essential fiction for several generations of children. This new edition is a companion volume (same page size, similar design) to our edition of The Golden Key, of which Publishers' Weekly said: "Maurice Sendak lights the way through MacDonald's Kingdom with the most mystical, the most poetic pictures of his distinguished career." Now Sendak has made the pictures The Light Princess always deserved to have. This is the only separate edition available that preserves the authentic text; it is neither cut nor edited nor "improved" in any way.

    The Golden Key

    The Golden Key
    The adventurous wanderings of a boy and girl to find the keyhole which fits the rainbow's golden key.

    The Bee-man of Orn

    The Bee-man of Orn
    HarperCollins continues with its commitment to reissue Maurice Sendak's most beloved works in hardcover by making available again this 1964 reprinting of an original fairytale by Frank R. Stockton, as illustrated by the incomparable Maurice Sendak. In the ancient country of Orn there lived an old man who was called the Bee-man, because his whole time was spent in the company of bees. One day a Junior Sorcerer stopped at the hut of the Bee-man. The Junior Sorcerer told the Bee-man that he has been transformed. "If you will find out what you have been transformed from, I will see that you are made all right again," said the Sorcerer. Could it have been a giant, or a powerful prince, or some gorgeous being whom the magicians or the fairies wish to punish? The Bee-man sets out to discover his original form.

  • Hole Is to Dig, A

    Hole Is to Dig, A
    What is a hole? A hole is when you step in it you go down A hole is for a mouse to live in. And, of course,a hole is to dig. This is the funniest book of definitions you'll ever read!

    Mommy?

    Mommy?
    Maurice Sendak's first pop-up book! They're all here! Everybody's favorite monsters are just going about their business when a plucky little boy wanders into their cuckoo house. And what does he want? He wants Mommy! No matter how scary these monsters are, there's no besting a little boy who's looking for his mommy. In one hilarious pop-up extravaganza after another, this kid shows them a thing or two.

    A Kiss for Little Bear

    A Kiss for Little Bear
    Too much kissing? Little Bear sends Grandmother a picture, and she likes it so much she asks Hen to take him a thank-you kiss. But Hen passes the kiss to Frog, who passes it to Cat, and on and on—will Little Bear ever get his kiss?

    Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle's Farm

    Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle's Farm
    Ms. Piggle-Wiggle's left her upside-down town house and has moved to a farm in the country. With the help of her cows and pigs and horses, she's still curing girls and boys of their bad habits. So whatever the problem-from pet forgetter-itis to fraidycat-ness-the parents all exclaim, "Better call Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle!"

  • What Do You Say, Dear?

    What Do You Say, Dear?
    What do you say when: you bump into a crocodile on a crowded city street? a nice gentleman introduces you to a baby elephant? the Queen feeds you so much spaghetti that you don't fit in your chair anymore? This is the funniest book of manners you'll ever read!

    The House of Sixty Fathers

    The House of Sixty Fathers
    THE HOUSE OF SIXTY FATHERSTien Pao is all alone in enemy territoy. Only a few days before, his family had escaped from the Japanese army, fleeing downriver by boat. Then came the terrible rainstorm. Tien Pao was fast asleep in the little sampan when the boat broke loose from its moorings and drifted right back to the Japanese soldiers. With only his lucky pig for company, Tien Pao must begin a long and dangerous journey in search of his home and family. ‘A vividly realistic story of China during the early days of the Japanese invasion [which tells of young Tien Pao’s journey to find his family].’ —C.‘Valuable as enrichment literature for elementary students involved in Chinese studies.’ —Scholastic Teacher.

    I Saw Esau

    I Saw Esau
    The Schoolchild's Pocket Book
    "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt me." That's what children chant when they are being teased; it's what their parents chanted, and probably their grandparents before them. Collected in this invaluable book are the wit and wisdom of generations of schoolchildren—more than 170 selections ranging from insults and riddles to jeers and jump-rope rhymes. With Iona Opie's introduction and detailed notes and Maurice Sendak's remarkable pictures—vignettes, sequences, and full-page paintings both wickedly funny and comically sad—it offers knowledge and entertainment to all who open it.

    Dear Mili

    Dear Mili
    On September 28, 1983, the discovery of a previously unknown tale by Wilhelm Grimm was reported on the front page of The New York Times. “After more than 150 years,” the Times noted, “Hansel and Gretel, Snow-White, Rumpelstiltskin, and Cinderella will be joined by another Grimm fairy-tale character.” The story of dear Mili was preserved in a letter Wilhelm Grimm wrote to a little girl in 1816, a letter that remained in her family’s possession for over a century and a half. It tells of a mother who sends her daughter into the forest to save her from a terrible war. The child comes upon the hut of an old man, who gives her shelter, and she repays his kindness by serving him faithfully for what she thinks are three days. Actually, thirty years have passed, but Mili has remained safe, and with the old man’s blessing there is still time for a tender reunion with her mother. As for the pictures that interpret Dear Mili—hailed by School Library Journal as “gorgeous”—they were a milestone in Maurice Sendak’s career, the work of a master at the height of his powers.

Bookish