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John Maynard Keynes

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John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) was an economist, mathematician, civil servant, educator, journalist, and a world-renowned author. His two great works, A Treatise on Money and The General Theory of Unemployment, Interest, and Money, revolutionized the study and practice of economics and changed monetary policy after World War II.
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John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) was an economist, mathematician, civil servant, educator, journalist, and a world-renowned author. His two great works, A Treatise on Money and The General Theory of Unemployment, Interest, and Money, revolutionized the study and practice of economics and changed monetary policy after World War II.
Books by thisAuthor
  • The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money

    The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money
    Distinguished British economist John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) set off a series of movements that drastically altered the ways in which economists view the world. In his most important work, The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money (1936), Keynes critiqued the laissez-faire policies of his day, particularly the proposition that a normally functioning market economy would bring full employment. Keynes's forward-looking work transformed economics from merely a descriptive and analytic discipline into one that is policy oriented. For Keynes, enlightened government intervention in a nation's economic life was essential to curbing what he saw as the inherent inequalities and instabilities of unregulated capitalism.

    Essays in Persuasion

    Essays in Persuasion
    In the light of subsequent history,

    Essays in Biography

    Essays in Biography
    This reissue of the authoritative Royal Economic Society edition of Essays in Biography features a new introduction by Donald Winch, which examines the continued relevance of this classic work. The volume presents a collection of Keynes' biographical writings and sketches of his friends and of the great economists of his time.

    The Economic Consequences of the Peace

    The Economic Consequences of the Peace
    John Maynard Keynes, at the time a rising young economist, abruptly resigned his position as adviser to the British delegation negotiating the peace treaty ending World War I. Frustrated and angered by the Allies' focus on German war guilt, Keynes predicted that the vindictive reparations policy, which locked Germany into long-term payments, would not only stifle the German economy for another generation but leave Europe in ruins. Published in 1919, Keynes's The Economic Consequences of the Peace aroused heated debates throughout Europe; his remarkably prescient conclusions were frequently cited by German leaders during the decades between the wars. Keynes's well-reasoned yet impassioned arguments, peppered with biting portraits of the statesen involved in the peace treaty—including Llyod George, Georges Clemenceau, and Woodrow Wilson—brought him immediate fame. "The most important economic document relating to World War I and its aftermath" —John Kenneth Galbraith

  • The Economic Consequences of Peace

    The Economic Consequences of Peace
    Generally regarded as the most influential social science treatise of the 20th century, this work by legendary economist John Maynard Keynes is relevant reading even today for anyone who wants to understand international economics and foreign affairs. First published in 1919, The Economic Consequences of Peace created an intense and immediate controversy for its brazen criticism of world leaders and the Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I. Keynes argued that as a blueprint for peace, it was destined to create tension and conflict ahead...and history proved him right when world war broke out again within a generation. The popularity of this key work, and its place in history, helped cement Keynes’s status as one of the 20th century’s principal economists.

    A Tract on Monetary Reform

    A Tract on Monetary Reform
    This treatise, written in 1923 by the renowned proponent of deficit spending, is devoted to the need for stable currency as the indispensable foundation to a healthy world economy. Keynes begins by laying out data showing the serious fluctuations in the value of money that began in 1914 and subjected North America, Europe, and India to injurious cycles of inflation and deflation. He describes the various effects on investors, business people, and wage earners of this erratic underlying influence and makes it clear that policies limiting such fluctuations must be implemented to ensure greater economic and social stability. He finds the gold standard, which was used as the basis of value for many currencies, including the U.S. dollar at that time, to be ultimately unreliable since gold itself is also prey to unstable valuations. In the final analysis he recommends the implementation of policies by Great Britain and the United States that aim at achieving stability of the commodity value of the dollar rather than the gold value. "[T]he ideal state of affairs," he argues, "is an intimate co-operation between the Federal Reserve Board and the Bank of England, as a result of which stability of prices and of exchange would be achieved at the same time." As always, Keynes proved to be amazingly prescient: The United States did eventually abandon the gold standard and the U.S. dollar is indeed the basis of currency values today. Keynes's brilliant, clear analysis of the world monetary situation at the beginning of the twentieth century, with his many suggestions and his masterful elucidation of economic principles, is still well worth reading today at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

    Keynes on the Wireless

    Keynes on the Wireless
    This book brings together John Maynard Keynes' infamous BBC wireless broadcasts, specially selected from the Royal Economic Society edition of Keynes' Collected Writings. With an introduction by Donald Moggridge, this unique anthology provides an insight into Keynes' influence and legendary contribution to economics, which still resonates today.

    The End of Laissez-Faire

    The End of Laissez-Faire
    The Economic Consequences of the Peace
    John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) was one of the most influential economists of the first half of the twentieth century. In The End of Laissez-Faire (1926), Keynes presents a brief historical review of laissez-faire economic policy.

  • A Treatise on Probability

    A Treatise on Probability
    With this insightful exploration of the probabilistic connection between philosophy and the history of science, the famous economist breathed new life into studies of both disciplines. Originally published in 1921, this important mathematical work represented a significant contribution to the theory regarding the logical probability of propositions, and launched the “logical-relationist” theory.

    A Revision of the Treaty

    A Revision of the Treaty

    The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money

    The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money

    A Treatise on Money

    A Treatise on Money
    Two Volumes Complete in One

  • A Treatise on Money

    A Treatise on Money
    The Pure Theory of Money and the Applied Theory...

    A Treatise on Probability - Unabridged

    A Treatise on Probability - Unabridged

    A Treatise on Money

    A Treatise on Money
    The Applied Theory of Money

    Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren

    Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren

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