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George Lamming

About This Author
George Lamming is the author of The Emigrants, In the Castle of My Skin, Natives of My Person, Of Age and Innocence, The Pleasures of Exile, and Season of Adventure. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Pennsylvania and a lecturer in Australia, Denmark, and Tanzania.
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George Lamming is the author of The Emigrants, In the Castle of My Skin, Natives of My Person, Of Age and Innocence, The Pleasures of Exile, and Season of Adventure. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Pennsylvania and a lecturer in Australia, Denmark, and Tanzania.
Books by thisAuthor
  • Season of Adventure

    Season of Adventure
    First published in 1960,Season of Adventuredetails the story of Fola, a light-skinned middle-class girl who has been tipped out of her easy hammock of social privilege into the complex political and cultural world of her recently independent homeland, the Caribbean island of San Cristobal. After attending a ceremony of the souls to raise the dead, she is carried off by the unrelenting accompaniment of steel drums onto a mysterious journey in search of her past and of her identity. Gradually, she is caught in the crossfire of a struggle between people who have "pawned their future to possessions" and those "condemned by lack of learning to a deeper truth." The music of the drums sounds throughout the novel, "loud as gospel to a believer's ears," and at the end stands alone as witness to the tradition which is slowly being destroyed in the name of European values. Whether through literary production or public pronouncements, George Lamming has explored the phenomena of colonialism and imperialism and their impact on the psyche of Caribbean people. First published in 1960,Season of Adventurereveals not only these themes, but involves the reader in the analysis of the forms and discourses of resistance employed by the region's people in the course of reproducing their social existence. George Lamming was born in Barbados, resides in London and teaches regularly in American universities. He is the author ofIn the Castle of My Skin, Natives of my Person, The Emigrants,andThe Pleasures of Exile,also available from the University of Michigan Press.

    In the Castle of My Skin

    In the Castle of My Skin
    An autobiographical novel of race and class by one of the leading Black writers of the 20th century

    The Emigrants

    The Emigrants
    A compelling and intricate novel of emigration and the effects of colonialism on a people

    Water with Berries

    Water with Berries
    Teeton lives three lives in England—one with a bohemian group of artist exiles, another is his curiously intimate relationship with his landlady, and finally as a secret revolutionary from the Caribbean island of San Cristobal. Thus far, Teeton has kept each aspect of his life separate from one another, but when he returns home and joins an incipient revolt, his once separate worlds begin to fuse together with disastrous results. This novel is a powerful study of the impossibility of disentangling British and Caribbean lives, the nature of misogyny, and the conflict between the calls of art and revolution.

  • The Pleasures of Exile

    The Pleasures of Exile
    An examination of the effects of colonialism on those who are held in check

    Sovereignty of the Imagination

    Sovereignty of the Imagination
    Conversations III
    Literary Nonfiction. Political Science. African American Studies. "SOVEREIGNTY OF THE IMAGINATION gives us that capacity for language and therefore the ability to name and establish categories. But this is not just a literary capacity; it allows us to define freedom. George Lamming recognizes the centrality of the quest for freedom for the social group that he calls 'this world of men and women from down below'"--Prof. Anthony Bogues, Political Science, Brown University.

    A History of the Guyanese Working People, 1881-1905

    A History of the Guyanese Working People, 1881-1905
    Completed shortly before Walter Rodney's assassination in June 1980, A History of the Guyanese Working People, 1881-1905 provides an original, well-informed, and perceptive contribution to the historiography of nineteenth-century Guyanese society. This comprehensive examination encompasses the history of African and Asian immigration into Guyana, the interaction of ethnic groups, the impact of British colonialism, economic and political constraints on the working class, and the social life of the masses. Rodney argues that the social evolution of the Guyanese working people has been guided by specific material constraints and extremely powerful external focuses from Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America. He emphasizes the destructive fragmentation of the working class along ethnic, political, and social lines, encouraged by the legacy of slavery, postslavery immigration, legal distinctions between various classes of labor, and the economic bases of the society. in contrast to the well-defined middle and upper classes, the working people appeared divided, disorganized, and leaderless. Rodney's account ends in 1905, when the hardships and frustrations of the masses exploded into violence. A History of the Guyanese Working People, 1881-1905 will stand alone as a landmark study of the profound social upheaval that characterized Guyanese society in the years following emancipation. Anyone interested in the problems of underdeveloped nations, labor control, and the after-effects of colonialism and imperialism will appreciate the significance of this work.

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