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E. M. Forster

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E.M. Forster (1879-1970) was perhaps the most quintessential of English novelists. From the stifling drawing rooms of Howard's End to the dust and dark undercurrents of Passage to India, he captured the spirit of his time in a way that has made his six novels unforgettable and much-loved classics.

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E.M. Forster (1879-1970) was perhaps the most quintessential of English novelists. From the stifling drawing rooms of Howard's End to the dust and dark undercurrents of Passage to India, he captured the spirit of his time in a way that has made his six novels unforgettable and much-loved classics.

Books by thisAuthor
  • Alexandria

    Alexandria
    A History and Guide
    "Alexandria is still alive and alters even when one tries to sum her up... Only the climate, only the north wind and the sea remain as pure as when Menelaus, the first visitor, landed three thousand years ago..." - E.M. Forster In the autumn of 1915, in a slightly heroic mood, E.M. Forster arrived in Alexandria, full of lofty ideals as a volunteer for the Red Cross. Yet most of his time was spent exploring the magic, antiquity and complexity of the place in order to cope with living in what he saw as a "funk-hole". With a novelist's pen, he brings to life the fabled, romantic city of Alexander the Great, capital of Graeco-Roman Egypt, beacon of light and culture symbolized by the Pharaohs, where the doomed love affair of Antony and Cleopatra was played out and the greatest library the world has ever known was built. Threading 3,000 years of history with vibrant strands of literature and punctuating the narrative with his own experiences, Forster immortalized Alexandria, painting an incomparable portrait of the great city and, inadvertently, himself.

    Howards End

    Howards End
    Centennial Edition
    A 20th-century classic on British society's class warfare, as seen through the eyes of three different castes. Howards End, a house in the Herefordshire countryside, is the source of conflict between these parties-and ultimately a symbol of class conflict in England.

    The Longest Journey

    The Longest Journey
    E. M. Forster once described The Longest Journey as the book "I am most glad to have written." An introspective novel of manners at once comic and tragic, it tells of a sensitive and intelligent young man with an intense imagination and a certain amount of literary talent. He sets out full of hope to become a writer, but gives up his aspirations for those of the conventional world, gradually sinking into a life of petty conformity and bitter disappointments.

    Where Angels Fear to Tread

    Where Angels Fear to Tread
    A wonderful story of questioning, disillusionment, and conversion, Where Angels Fear to Tread tells the story of a prim English family's encounter with the foreign land of Italy. When attractive, impulsive English widow Lilia marries Gino, a dashing and highly unsuitable Italian twelve years her junior, her snobbish former in-laws make no attempts to hide their disapproval. But their expedition to face the uncouth foreigner takes an unexpected turn when they return to Italy under tragic circumstances intending to rescue Lilia and Gino's baby.

  • A Room with a View

    A Room with a View
    This Edwardian social comedy explores love and prim propriety among an eccentric cast of characters assembled in an Italian pensione and in a corner of Surrey, England. A charming young English woman, Lucy Honeychurch, faints into the arms of a fellow Britisher when she witnesses a murder in a Florentine piazza. Attracted to this man, George Emerson--who is entirely unsuitable and whose father just may be a Socialist--Lucy is soon at war with the snobbery of her class and her own conflicting desires. Back in England she is courted by a more acceptable, if stifling, suitor, and soon realizes she must make a startling decision that will decide the course of her future: she is forced to choose between convention and passion. The enduring delight of this tale of romantic intrigue is rooted in Forster's colorful characters, including outrageous spinsters, pompous clergymen and outspoken patriots. Written in 1908, A Room With A View is one of E.M. Forster's earliest and most celebrated works.

    Howards End

    Howards End
    In Howard's End, E.M. Forster unveils the English character as never before, exploring the underlying class warfare involving three distinct groups--a wealthy family bound by the rules of tradition and property, two independent, cultured sisters, and a young man living on the edge of poverty. The source of their conflict--Howards End, a house in the countryside which ultimately becomes a symbol of conflict within British society.

    Maurice

    Maurice
    A Novel
    Set in the elegant Edwardian world of Cambridge undergraduate life, this story by a master novelist introduces us to Maurice Hall when he is fourteen. We follow him through public school and Cambridge, and on into his father's firm, Hill and Hall, Stock Brokers. In a highly structured society, Maurice is a conventional young man in almost every way, "stepping into the niche that England had prepared for him": except that his is homosexual. Written during 1913 and 1914, immediately after Howards End, and not published until 1971, Maurice was ahead of its time in its theme and in its affirmation that love between men can be happy. "Happiness," Forster wrote, "is its keynote. In Maurice I tried to create a character who was completely unlike myself or what I supposed myself to be: someone handsome, healthy, bodily attractive, mentally torpid, not a bad businessman and rather a snob. Into this mixture I dropped an ingredient that puzzles him, wakes him up, torments him and finally saves him."

    Abinger Harvest

    Abinger Harvest
    This collection of articles, essays, reviews, and poems, written by the author of A Passage to India, contains such well-known pieces as "Notes on the English Character,' 'Adrift in India," and "Me, Them and You." Also collected are essays on literary figures whose work Forster especially admired.

  • Selected Stories

    Selected Stories
    Although he is best known for his exquisite novels, E.M. Forster also wrote remarkable short stories. He referred to his stories as ‘fantasies’ and his attraction to myth and magic is apparent in many of them. Like his novels, the stories – whether they are set in Italy, Greece, India, and other places Forster visited, or in England itself – contrast the freedom of paganism with the restraints of English civilization, the personal, sensual delights of the body with the impersonal, inhibiting rules imposed by society. Rich in irony and alive with sharp observations on the surprises life holds, the stories often feature violent events, discomforting coincidences, and other disruptive happenings that throw the characters’ perceptions and beliefs off balance. This volume includes all twelve stories published during Forster’s lifetime.

    Two Cheers For Democracy

    Two Cheers For Democracy
    Essays that applaud democracy's toleration of individual freedom and self-criticism and deplore its encouragement of mediocrity: "We may still contrive to raise three cheers for democracy, although at present she only deserves two."

    Alexandria

    Alexandria
    A History and a Guide
    The aim of the Abinger Editions is to provide a new, properly edited library of the literary works of E.M. Forster that does justice to his literary genius. The latest in the series is "Alexandria," written while Forster was in Egypt during the First World War. This edition collates and compares all the existing editions of the work to provide the definitive version of the text. It also contains the subsequent work by Forster, "Pharos and Pharillon."

    Eternal Moment And Other Stories

    Eternal Moment And Other Stories
    A collection that explores the human spirit through a series of fantasy vignettes, including "The Machine Stops," "The Point of It," "Mr. Andrews," "Co-ordination," "The Story of the Siren," and the title story.

  • The Creator As Critic and Other Writings

    The Creator As Critic and Other Writings
    E.M. Forster, whose novelsA Room with a View,Howards End, andA Passage to Indiaprobe the values of the English middle class, is recognized as one of the twentieth century's most distinguished authors. He was also a highly respected literary critic.The Creator as Criticcontains more than 40 of Forster's hitherto-unpublished essays, lectures, and memoirs, spanning the period 1898 to 1960. They reflect his views on a wide range of authors: Coleridge, Tolstoy, Pater, Wilde, James, Hardy, Butler, Housman, Kipling, Joyce, Lawrence, Proust, Cavafy, and others. The Creator as Criticalso presents the original texts of some 30 broadcasts made by Forster for the BBC between 1928 and 1959. These radio talks, collected for the first time in this volume, are the thoughtful and thought-provoking products of Forster's active engagement with the literary, political, and social events of his time.

    Works of E. M. Forster

    Works of E. M. Forster
    Howards End; The Longest Journey; A Room with A...
    This collection was designed for optimal navigation on Sony Reader and other electronic devices. It is indexed alphabetically, chronologically and by category, making it easier to access individual books. This collection offers lower price, the convenience of a one-time download, and it reduces the clutter in your digital library. All books included in this collection feature a hyperlinked table of contents and footnotes. The collection is complimented by an author biography. Table of Contents: Howards End The Longest Journey The Machine Stops A Room With A View Where Angels Fear to Tread Appendix E. M. Forster Biography About and Navigation

    Science Fiction Classics

    Science Fiction Classics
    The first full-color volume in the Graphic Classics series features an all-new comics adaptation of H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds" by Rich Rainey and Micah Farritor. Also E.M. Forster's dark vision of the future "The Machine Stops", illustrated by Ellen Lindner. Plus stories by Jules Verne, Stanley Weinbaum, Lord Dunsany and Arthur Conan Doyle, with art by Brad Teare, George Sellas, Roger Langridge, Johnny Ryan and Hunt Emerson.

    Alexandria

    Alexandria
    A History and a Guide Including, Pharos and...
    E.M. Forster's study of Alexandria, which he wrote while stationed in the city during the First World War, has appeared only once in the United States and has long been out of print. This new edition will add the essays "Pharos" and "the Pharillon" which were published in 1923 and which completed his attempt, "after the fashion of a pageant, to marshal the activities of Alexandria during two thousand two hundred and fifty years of her existence."Forster was a great admirer of Baedeker and Murray's guides and Alexandria: A History and a Guide is cross-referenced to help the reader and the traveler "link the present and the past." Beautifully illustrated, this is both a guide to one of the great city-centers of the Mediterranean and a subtle work of history, comparative civilization, and religion.

  • Untouchable

    Untouchable
    Bakha is a young man, proud and even attractive, yet none the less he is an outcast in India’s caste system: an Untouchable. In deceptively simple prose this groundbreaking novel describes a day in the life of Bakha, sweeper and toilet-cleaner, as he searches for a meaning to the tragic existence he has been born into – and comes to an unexpected conclusion. Mulk Raj Anand poured a vitality, fire and richness of detail into his controversial work, which led him to be acclaimed as his country’s Charles Dickens and one of the twentieth century’s most important Indian writers.

    Untouchable

    Untouchable

    The Story of the Siren

    The Story of the Siren

    The Government of Egypt

    The Government of Egypt

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