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Dorothy Hoobler

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Dorothy Hoobler is a historian and author of over sixty books, both fiction and nonfiction, mostly for young readers. Her and her husband are the authors of the well-loved American Family Album series, including The Japanese American Family Album, which was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book in 1997. The Society for School Librarians International chose their book Showa: The Era of Hirohito for a best book award in 1991, and they have been cited for excellence by the Library of Congress, the Parents' Choice Foundation, Bank Street College, the International Reading Association, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the New York Public Library.
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Dorothy Hoobler is a historian and author of over sixty books, both fiction and nonfiction, mostly for young readers. Her and her husband are the authors of the well-loved American Family Album series, including The Japanese American Family Album, which was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book in 1997. The Society for School Librarians International chose their book Showa: The Era of Hirohito for a best book award in 1991, and they have been cited for excellence by the Library of Congress, the Parents' Choice Foundation, Bank Street College, the International Reading Association, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the New York Public Library.
Books by thisAuthor
  • The Demon in the Teahouse

    The Demon in the Teahouse
    The beautiful, mysterious women of Japan are being killed one by one. The famous samurai Judge Ooka knows he will need help to solve the crimes, so he turns to his newly adopted son, fourteen-year-old Seikei. Determined to prove his worth as a samurai, Seikei goes undercover as a teahouse attendant in the exotic "floating city" of Yoshiwara, where demons lurk among the pleasure seekers and no one is safe-not even a samurai.

    The Ghost in the Tokaido Inn

    The Ghost in the Tokaido Inn
    While attempting to solve the mystery of a stolen jewel, Seikei, a merchant's son who longs to be a samurai, joins a group of kabuki actors in eighteenth-century Japan.

    The Sword That Cut the Burning Grass

    The Sword That Cut the Burning Grass
    When fourteen-year-old samurai apprentice Seikei is sent on a mission by the shogun, he believes it to be a simple one: convince the fourteen-year-old emperor to resume his ceremonial duties. But then the emperor is kidnapped, and Seikei finds himself in the middle of an elaborate plot to overthrow the shogun. With the help of a mysterious warrior, he must rescue the emperor before the sacred sword—said to be unbeatable in battle—falls into the wrong hands. Seikei knows he must succeed, or bloodshed will stain the land.

    The Chinese American Family Album

    The Chinese American Family Album
    The Chinese American Family Albumis a scrapbook of family letters and diary entries, official documents, newspaper articles, and excerpts from literature of the past and present--a personal remembrance of an extended family of Chinese immigrants and their descendants. As we read, we begin to know this family almost as well as our own. The letters written by the new immigrants to the folks left behind in China allow us to feel the ache of leaving home and family behind. Clippings from newspapers and personal memories tell of the pain and fear and prejudice in the new country. We learn about the building of the transcontinental railroad and how Chinese immigrants were the backbone of the work force, tailing long hours under the worst conditions. We see Chinatowns spring up wherever the immigrants landed, and we see how the traditions and culture of China were both preserved and altered as the immigrants became Americanized. But we also share the joy of first sighting the new homeland. We follow families through the generations and see how they are living now and what they have brought to our country. We read about famous Chinese Americans who have risen to the top of their fields, such as athlete Michael Chang, author Amy Tan, musician Yo-Yo Ma, and Senator Hiram Fong. And we see wonderful faces--husbands alone in the new world, families reunited, new babies, grandparents. The unique, carefully researched photographs make the participants in the Chinese American experience real people who have an impact on our lives. Thomas and Dorothy Hoobler'sThe Chinese American Family Albummakes the past experiences of these immigrants--and those of their sons and daughters in all the generations since--as real and immediate as the stories told by a favorite grandmother. They bring us in, like an embrace, to the all-encompassing, ever-growing, multicultural family of Americans.

  • A Samurai Never Fears Death

    A Samurai Never Fears Death
    For Seikei, the adopted son of the famous samurai Judge Ooka with a knack for solving mysteries, a trip home to see his real family isn’t cause to celebrate. His brother has become mixed up with local criminals who use the family’s tea shop as a front for a smuggling operation. His sister, meanwhile, has fallen in love with an apprentice to a puppet master who stands accused of murder. Somehow, Seikei senses the two are connected. His loyalties divided between his new family and his old, Seikei must find the real killer before it is too late. Set against the eerie backdrop of the old Japanese puppet theaters, where life-sized marionettes were controlled by black-cloaked men, Edgar Award-winners Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler render their most satisfying mystery to date.

    The Crimes of Paris

    The Crimes of Paris
    A True Story of Murder, Theft, and Detection
    Turn-of-the-century Paris was the beating heart of a rapidly changing world. Painters, scientists, revolutionaries, poets--all were there. But so, too, were the shadows: Paris was a violent, criminal place, its sinister alleyways the haunts of Apache gangsters and its cafes the gathering places of murderous anarchists. In 1911, it fell victim to perhaps the greatest theft of all time--the taking of the Mona Lisa from the Louvre. Immediately, Alphonse Bertillon, a detective world-renowned for pioneering crime-scene investigation techniques, was called upon to solve the crime. And quickly the Paris police had a suspect: a young Spanish artist named Pablo Picasso....

    Seven Paths to Death

    Seven Paths to Death
    The most exciting installment to the Edgar Award?winning samurai mystery series. When a man with a tattoo covering his back is found floating in the water at a rice ceremony, Seikei and Judge Ooka know it?s a bad omen. Soon there are seven of these men with partial tattoos on their backs. All different, all dead, all seemingly unrelated?except for the tattoos. It becomes apparent these men are not just carrying body art, but a treasure map . . . to what? And why is carrying this map so mortally dangerous? Seikei must find and assemble all seven tattoos to find the answer? and the path to a most terrifying destination.

    The Second Decade

    The Second Decade
    Voyages
    An exciting ten-volume series that follows a single family through the twentieth century. Each book is set against the background of a successive decade, and the historic events, inventions, and cultural milieu of the featured decade are woven into the fictional narrative.

  • We Are Americans

    We Are Americans
    Voices Of The Immigrant Experience
    Through letters, diaries, and oral histories, WE ARE AMERICANS profiles the often challenging but ultimately rewarding experiences of US immigrants during the last 20,000 years. Every child will find an ancestor or contemporary in this collection of personal narratives that tells the story, chronologically, of immigrant groups in this nation. From the first human residents of North America, to the mass of Europeans in the 1800's, to today's modern Americans, each group has made significant and lasting contributions to the ever changing culture of the United States. Through the letters and oral histories, first person accounts and biographies, children will reflect on the many different

    The African American Family Album

    The African American Family Album
    The African American Family Albumis a collection of the memories and experiences of a people who were first Africans, then slaves, and finally African Americans. Unlike most other immigrants to this country, the majority of Africans were brought to America against their will. The first slaves from Africa arrived in the Americas in the 16th century. Over the next 450 years, it is estimated that more than 11 million Africans (some think as many as 40 million) were taken from their homeland in the largest forcible movement of people in history. Torn from Africa, chained and forced to endure the "middle passage" to their new country, destined for a lifetime of slavery--this was the historical beginning of the American experience for most of today's African Americans. But there are cases of Africans who avoided or escaped that fate to becomes explorers and pioneers in the New World. Those fortunate few are also part ofThe African American Family Album, as are the 4 million African Americans who found themselves newly freed at the end of the Civil War. Their struggles to gain financial independence were thwarted by prejudice and hatred, and the enforced separation of the races. With little political or economic power, many found freedom to be but one step above slavery. The Great Migration between 1910 and 1950 brought millions from the tenant farms and towns of the South to settle in northern cities, one of the greatest population shifts the United States has ever experienced. This migration was one African Americanschoseto make themselves. They moved for the same reasons that have brought other immigrant groups to the United States--to escape persecution and injustice and to find a better life. In the process, African Americans brought with them the blues, jazz, and gospel music that were to transform the culture of America. In cities and in the rural areas, in both the North and South, family loyalty, religion, and finally a movement for civil rights that brought purpose and hope to millions became key elements that held the African American family together. In their own words--from interviews, letters, diaries, newspaper articles, and published writings--the story of the African American unfolds in this moving and significantFamily Album. Photographs culled from archives, news sources, and family collections make the history that is told here real and immediate. Profiles of Sojourner Turth, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Toni Morrison, and other notable African Americans are included, as are the words of such famous figures as Jackie Robinson, Spike Lee, Langston Hughes, Hank Aaron, Ralph Abernathy, and many others less famous who also proudly call themselves African Americans. They bring the story up to date, and reinforce the importance of their African roots to today's African American. Their history is part of our country's story now, and an important component in the greatAmerican Family Album.

    The Monsters

    The Monsters
    Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein
    One murky night in 1816, on the shores of Lake Geneva, Lord Byron, famed English poet, challenged his friends to a contest--to write a ghost story. The assembled group included the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley; his lover (and future wife) Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin; Mary's stepsister Claire Claremont; and Byron's physician, John William Polidori. The famous result was Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, a work that has retained its hold on the popular imagination for almost two centuries. Less well-known was the curious Polidori's contribution: the first vampire novel. And the evening begat a curse, too: Within a few years of Frankenstein's publication, nearly all of those involved met untimely deaths. Drawing upon letters, rarely tapped archives, and their own magisterial rereading of Frankenstein itself, Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler have crafted a rip-roaring tale of obsession and creation.

    The Japanese American Family Album

    The Japanese American Family Album
    The first Japanese immigrants to the United States came to Hawaii to work on sugar plantations, quickly followed by others who came to mainland cities. Their images of America were formed by popular guidebooks with titles such asMysterious AmericaandCome, Japanese!that promised, "Gold, silver, and gems are scattered on [the] streets. If you can figure out a way of picking them up, you'll become rich instantly." The Japanese arrived with the hope of making a better life for themselves. Their experiences, however, were often far different from what they had expected. The Japanese American Family Albumdocuments the lives of generations of Japanese immigrants through their own diaries, letters, interviews, photographs, articles from newspapers and magazines, and personal reflections. This personal history tells us--in their own words--what it was like to leave the beloved homeland for a life as different from life at home as could be imagined. TheIssei--members of the first generation of Japanese immigrants--faced racial prejudice and even laws that effectively stopped Japanese immigration from 1924 until 1965. By then there were well over 100,000 Japanese immigrants on the U.S. mainland who daily faced unfamiliar customs, terrible working conditions, and strong anti-Japanese sentiment. Even in the face of such adversity, Japanese Americans formed labor unions, successfully purchased land and built farms, and established flourishing communities in Los Angeles, Sacramento, Fresno, Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, and Salt Lake City, as well as the Hawaiian cities of Honolulu and Hilo. The very success of these farmers and other Japanese immigrants caused jealousy and fear, and theAlbumalso tells of anti-Japanese groups, boycotts against Japanese shops and businesses, discriminatory laws, and even violence. With World War II came the nightmare of the concentration camps, and then the struggle to heal the many wounds caused by internment. A strong sense of family, religion, and a resilient spirit allowed Japanese Americans to survive the prejudice in their new homeland. Profiles of noted Japanese Americans such as Daniel K. Inouye, Patsy Takemoto Mink, and astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka are testaments to the success the Japanese American community has achieved. The heartfelt words and remarkable family photos inThe Japanese American Family Albumtell a true American story that is an important part of our history. Eighty-eight year old Osuke Takizawa, who emigrated to the U.S. as a young man, says inThe Japanese American Family Album, "I believe children and grandchildren must know the way their grandparents walked." The precious stories and pictures of the Japanese Americans from our past and present show us the way.

  • Real American Girls Tell Their Own Stories

    Real American Girls Tell Their Own Stories
    Messages from the Heart and Heartland
    Open this book to all the joys and troubles, the triumphs and disappointments, of being an American girl. Here is the chance to read selections from private diaries and look at the portraits of real girls across two centuries. From best friends to boyfriends, hair problems to homework problems, it seems there will always be some things only girls can understand. Maybe you'll be surprised at how similar these girls' diaries are to your own. They took walks in the woods and read novels, had trouble learning English as a second language, wrote essays about George Washington for history class, experienced their first kisses and first periods, and struggled to prove they were just as good as boys. But you'll probably also find that a lot of things were very different for girls who lived a century or more ago. For instance, have you ever named your bedposts after boys you like? Is the word pants considered improper at your school? Do you wear a skate key around your neck on a string, or shop for calico at a dry goods store? In these excerpts and images, girls of all ages will find surprises and revelations and meet some new friends along the way. Here are American girls from a vast array of backgrounds: wealthy and poor, from urban and rural areas, both famous and not-so-famous. Be there as they share friendships, school days, get into mischief, have fun, fall in love, and become real American women.

    Vanity Rules

    Vanity Rules
    A History of American Fashion and Beauty
    Societal and economic changes often bring about fashion and cosmetic innovations. These larger concerns are woven into a delightfully readable history of the changes in the American beauty ideal from colonial times to the end of the twentieth century.

    The Jewish American Family Album

    The Jewish American Family Album
    As long ago as September 1654, 23 Jews disembarked from a ship named theSainte Catherineinto New Amsterdam--today's New York City. They came to find a safe haven from oppression and religious persecution and to seek economic opportunity. But even they were not the first Jewish Americans, and they were certainly not the last. Three million Jewish immigrants followed in the next three centuries. Today, about 4 out of every 10 Jews in the world are U. S. citizens. The Jewish American Family Albumtells personal stories of Jewish immigrants from their arrival in this country (as early as 1579) to the present day. Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler have found letters, diaries, and newspaper articles that describe what life was like in the old countries and tell of the difficulties encountered in leaving home for a new life in America. They have combed through family archives and scrapbooks to find personal accounts that make history as immediate and exciting as stories told generation after generation in any family. In their own words, we learn what life was like for these millions of Jewish immigrants. We read of the earliest of the Jewish Americans, some of whom fought and died in the Revolution. We hear from Holocaust survivors and their children. We discover that from the beginning, Jewish Americans provided a base of support--lodging and fellowship--for those who followed. The part Jewish Americans played in the settlement of the American West, their strategic importance to the U.S. labor movement, and their many contributions to theater and music are documented with rare first-person accounts and extraordinary photographs. We hear of the challenges the immigrants faced, including anti-Semitism, even in the "Land of the Free." But Jewish Americans linked old traditions with new ones to build communities that have become a permanent and important part of American life. The memories and experiences of well-known Jewish Americans such as comedians George Burns and Jack Benny, Oscar Solomon Straus (the first Jewish Presidential cabinet member), and novelist Edna Ferber are included, as are profiles of Barbra Streisand, Steven Spielberg, Leonard Bernstein, union leader Samuel Gompers, and poet Emma Lazarus, among others. But other Jewish Americans who did not achieve celebrity status are also represented. Moses Albert Levy, a doctor who joined Sam Houston's army, 13-year-old Mary Antin, who arrived in Boston in 1894, Sarah Thal, who was a homesteader in the Dakotas, and many more fascinating but unknown immigrants tell powerful, emotional, and sometimes funny stories of life in their new homeland. These memories and profiles are illustrated with rare and moving photographs from news sources and family collections. They show in vivid fashion a people who have brought us humor, spirit, and perseverance.The Jewish American Family Albumis an important tribute to the magnificent variety of people and cultures that makes up our United States.

    The Irish American Family Album

    The Irish American Family Album
    Erin go bragh. Ireland forever. The popular Celtic saying is heard in the United States from New York to San Francisco because there are more than 39 million Americans who list their ancestry as Irish. Nearly 800,000 Irish arrived here between 1841 and 1850, and 900,000 followed over the next decade. In other words, more than one out of every five people in Ireland left for the United States in that 20-year period. The Irish American Family Albumis a remarkable history and memoir. In their own words--from diary entries, letters, interviews, and personal reflections--and with photographs and clippings pulled from family archives and the press of the day, the rich and colorful history of the Irish immigration to this country is told with a passion and wit that is uniquely Irish. Life on the "ould sod" and the hardships of the great potato famine and British rule, the decision to leave, the arduous Atlantic journey, first impressions of their new home, settling in and building a new life--all are made immediate and real through the words and snapshots of the participants. But not all are happy memories. Most of the immigrants were young people and left Ireland with a heavy heart, believing that they would never again see those they left behind. They faced prejudice in this country--"No Irish Need Apply" was a familiar sign in shop windows and in newspaper advertisements--and living conditions in the tenements they could afford were a far cry from life on the farm back home. Many immigrants found their first jobs here as laborers. They were among the workers who built the Erie Canal, the transcontinental railroad, and the Statue of Liberty. In the west, Irish laborers found work as miners during the gold rush. Irish women often worked as servants in the houses of the upper class, or worked in the cloth mills of New England. Though prejudice tried to keep the majority at the bottom of society, the very size of the Irish American community made them a powerful political force, and in cities such as Boston, New York, and Chicago, the Irish took control of local political organizations and were soon a force to be reckoned with. There are many success stories inThe Irish American Family Album. The Kennedy family, film actor John Wayne, artist Georgia O'Keeffe, novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman justice of the Supreme Court--all bear witness to the strength and endurance of the Irish spirit. These and other famous Irish Americans are profiled throughout the book. But the real joy comes in seeing the multitude of faces in the rare and fascinating photographs, and reading memories of Irish grandmothers, of boys who grew up in "Hell's Kitchen" at the turn of the century, of an early union organizer, and the thousand of other voices that make up the proud and diverse Irish American community. Their stories add an important chapter to the multicultural portrait of America.

  • The Scandinavian American Family Album

    The Scandinavian American Family Album
    One of the first Europeans to discover North America, Leif Eriksson landed on its shores around the year 1000. His expedition was part of a great era of exploration and migration for the Nordic people and the beginning of a long history of Scandinavian involvement in the New World. By the middle of the nineteenth century, huge waves of America fever had spread through the Scandinavian countries and by 1907 an official of the Swedish government reported that it was difficult to find a farm where none of the immediate family was in America. Today, approximately 11.5 million Americans describe themselves as being of Norwegian, Swedish, Icelandic, Finnish, or Danish descent, a number that equals half the population of the five countries from which they and their ancestors came. The Scandinavian American Family Albumtells the history of this tremendous wave of immigration and of the contribution of Scandinavian people to the growth and development of the United States. Through their own diaries, letters, and through interviews, rare photographs, and songs, we are treated to a firsthand account of the hardships, challenges, and triumphs that awaited the generations of Scandinavian immigrants who made their way across the ocean to start new lives in America. We learn about their day-to-day life before emigration, the factors--such as social inequality, financial hardship, and overpopulation--that contributed to their decisions to leave, of their experience upon landing at Ellis Island, and the various occupations that they settled into as they began to establish homes and communities. We discover that the Danes were the first European settlers in the Bronx and Harlem in New York City and that Swedes and Finns built the first log cabins. Personal accounts describe homesteads and early colonies set up all over the country, from Maine to Illinois, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Kansas, and as far west as Utah and Nebraska. These early immigrants and their descendants tell us about pioneering farming ventures, the dangers and hardships of logging and mining, the thrill of the gold rush, and the struggle of early labor movements. All across the country, Scandinavian Americans played a key role in building the institutions and communities that still exist today. Among those who made distinguished contributions to American life and culture are Jacob Riis, the founder of modern photojournalism; Thorstein Veblen, renowned economist; sports legends Knute Rockne and Babe Didrikson Zaharias; aviator Charles Lindbergh; and Knute Nelson, the first Scandinavian American governor of Minnesota. Others profiled include actress Candice Bergen, dancer Peter Martins, Norman Borlaug, the first agricultural scientist to win the Nobel Peace Prize, novelist Ole Rölvaag and Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor who created the giant heads of four presidents on Mt. Rushmore. The stories and memories contained in this album, illustrated with vivid photographs drawn from a vast array of archives, make this volume a valuable window into the past of Scandinavian Americans and the country they now call home.

    The Italian American Family Album

    The Italian American Family Album
    An Italian immigrant says, "I came to America because I heard the streets were paved with gold. When I got here, I found out three things: first, the streets weren't paved with gold; second, they weren't paved at all; and third, I was expected to pave them." Against all odds--a new language, new customs, and the ethnic slurs and catcalls of prejudice--Italian Americans paved the streets, rolled the cigars, sewed the clothes, cooked the meals, and did all manner of back-breaking work to build a new life inLamerica, the land of success.The ItalianAmerican Family Albumbrings us into the heart of those immigrants' experiences. Through diaries, letters, interviews, and articles from magazines and newspapers we share the ordeals and the triumphs of the Italian American first setting foot on his new homeland. These personal accounts and family photographs of scores of Italian American families tell inspiring and courageous stories of hardship and suffering. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, the journey across the Atlantic was remembered by many as thevia dolorosa, the "sorrowful way." And even after arriving in the new homeland and successfully getting through immigration, finding a job and a place to live, and learning new ways of doing almost everything was a challenge. But there was joy in the new country, as well. The new arrivals were embraced by a community of fellow Italians with a grand sense of humor, an intense appreciation of music, and an even greater appreciation of good food. Life for the newcomer was full of old traditions and pleasure, and we hear first-hand how the old ways endured even as new philosophies and customs were embraced daily. Through the stories of the children of those early immigrants--writers Gay Talese and John Ciardi, entertainers like Tony Bennett, baseball great Yogi Berra, and others not famous, but still proud to call themselves Italian Americans--we see how family pride and strong ties to the old country survive even today. As Governor Mario Cuomo says in his introduction: "I have always been intensely proud that I am the son of Italian immigrants and that my Italian heritage helped make me the man I am." That pride and the unique experiences of the early Italian Americans are an integral part of our country's history. Through the memories and photographs from the albums of generations of Italian families we meet real people, cut of the same cloth as we are--a many-colored and multi-textured cloth of ethnic customs, languages, traditions, and memories. We are a nation of immigrants, andThe ItalianAmerican Family Albumbelongs to each of us.

    The Cuban American Family Album

    The Cuban American Family Album
    "When you ask my sons where they are from they will answer, 'I'm Cuban, but I was born in McAllen, Texas.'"--Maria Luisa Salcines, born in Guantánamo, Cuba, who came to the United States in 1963. Between 1960 and 1995 over one million Cubans arrived in the United States--almost 10 percent of the island's population. Many came in the dead of night with only the clothes on their backs. Though it is less than 100 miles from Cuba to the tip of Florida, the journey was often a dangerous and unpredictable voyage in makeshift boats. The "Golden Exiles" who escaped Fidel Castro's revolutionary government between 1959 and 1962 were probably the best-educated and wealthiest large group of immigrants ever to arrive in the United States. These immigrants who had been doctors, lawyers, bankers, business owners, and college professors in Cuba quickly established a community that remains a powerful political and economic force, and one that embraces the new Cuban immigrants who continue to arrive today. A whole generation of Cuban Americans has grown to adulthood in the United States. Many left the island as young children and have assimilated into American life. Others yearn for a life in Cuba they can only imagine from the stories their grandparents tell. These stories--full of longing and hope--are the heart ofThe Cuban American Family Album.Interviews, excerpts from diaries and letters, newspaper accounts, profiles of famous Cuban Americans, and remarkable pictures from real family albums tell a poignant yet exuberant story of a beautiful blending of Cuban and American traditions. The result is a vibrant picture of a distinctive and important American community.

    The Mexican American Family Album

    The Mexican American Family Album
    Mexican Americans have a unique relationship with the United States. Because of the proximity of the neighboring countries, the old traditions of Mexico remain ever close to their hearts even as they embrace a new life in America. As a matter of fact, the first Mexican Americans did not leave their homeland by choice to come to the United States. Instead, the United States went to them. At the end of the U.S.-Mexican War in 1848, Mexico was forced to cede territory that is now the southwestern United States, and the roughly 80,000 Mexicans who had been living in this vast territory suddenly found themselves living within U.S. borders. As the Tejanos (Texans of Mexican descent) say, "We never crossed a border. The border crossed us." Since then many Mexicans have crossed that border by choice, most in search of jobs. The obstacles they faced--racism, exploitation, the language barrier, poor wages--have not prevented them from becoming an integral part of the United States. The gifts they brought with them--folk art, food, music, literature, new words for the American vocabulary (taco, ranch, rodeo, fiesta), and strong ties to family and religion--are now a part of the American tradition.The Mexican American Family Albumis the record of generations of Mexicans who made the journey from the old country to a new life in the United States, told in their own words and photographs. César Chávez, Richard Rodriguez, Sandra Cisneros, Lee Treviño, Linda Ronstadt, and others profiled here testify to the success that many immigrants found in this country. But there are also stories from families not so famous. Their diary entries, letters, personal remembrances, and photographs culled from family archives, scrapbooks, and newspapers, tell of the hardship of poverty in the old country, of the decision to leave and the difficulties often encountered in crossing the border, of life inEl Barrio, of finding work, putting down roots, and the transition from newcomer to Mexican American. Through it all the common thread is a celebration of the Mexican heritage even as the immigrant becomes more and more "Americanized." It is that spirit that envelopsThe Mexican American Family Album--not only as a history of immigration from one country to another, but as a chronicle of the contributions, large and small, made by Mexican Americans. The continuing pride in the culture and traditions of Mexico have enhanced and strengthened their lives in their newly adopted country, and brought new dimensions to the multicultural society of America.

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