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Andy Warhol

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Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was one of the twentieth century's preeminent artists. Known primarily for his Pop Art, he was also a highly successful graphic artist in the early years of his career.
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Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was one of the twentieth century's preeminent artists. Known primarily for his Pop Art, he was also a highly successful graphic artist in the early years of his career.
Books by thisAuthor
  • Andy Warhol

    Andy Warhol
    Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Andy Warhol each significantly shaped the development of art in the twentieth century. These Modern masters are the subjects of four small books, the first volumes in a series featuring important artists in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art. Each book presents a single artist and guides readers through a dozen of his most memorable achievements. Works are reproduced in color and accompanied by informative and accessible short essays that provide background on the artworks and on the artist himself, illuminating technique, style, subject matter and significance. Written by Carolyn Lanchner, former Curator of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum, these books are excellent resources for readers interested in the stories behind masterpieces of the Modern canon and for those who wish to understand the contributions of individual artists to the history of Modern art. This volume focuses on Warhol.

    Andy Warhol Nudes

    Andy Warhol Nudes
    with an Introduction by Linda Nochlin The first book that brings together all of Andy Warhol's provocative nudes, including paintings, prints and drawings. Includes a group of 'pretty' nudes from the 50s, where sex organs are depicted as a desirable commodity, not unlike his advertising series for shoes; the 'Torso Series' of the 70s; some large drawings from the 70s and 80s; and a series of 'Sex Parts' from 1978. Features 28 full-colour plates and 25 two-colour plates.

    POPism

    POPism
    The Warhol Sixties
    Anecdotal, funny, frank, POPism is Warhol’s personal view of the Pop phenomenon in New York in the 1960s and a look back at the relationships that made up the scene at the Factory, including his rela­tionship with Edie Sedgewick, focus of the upcoming film Factory Girl. In the detached, back-fence gossip style he was famous for, Warhol tells all—the ultimate inside story of a decade of cultural revolution.

    The Andy Warhol Diaries

    The Andy Warhol Diaries
    Now in trade paperback, the sensational national bestseller that turns the spotlight on one of the most influential and controversial figures of our time. These pages are filled with previously undisclosed facts about the lives and loves of the irch and famous--from royalty to movie and music stars to renowned artists.

  • Andy Warhol

    Andy Warhol
    "Everyone Will Be Famous for 15 Minutes"
    Paintings are too hard. Machines have less problems

    Andy Warhol

    Andy Warhol
    A Guide to 706 Items in 2 Hours 56 Minutes
    Beyond the familiar Campbell's Soup cans, Brillo boxes, silkscreened Marilyn Monroes and floating silver mylar pillows, 20 years after Pop icon Andy Warhol's death, we are still picking through his incredibly prolific output to understand what his artistic legacy actually is. Andy Warhol: Other Voices, Other Rooms, published on the occasion of the major exhibition by the same name at Amsterdam's Stedelijk Museum, provides some new insight, digging into Warhol's lesser-known film, video and audio tape works. Important--and just a little scandalous--films like Blow Joband Kiss, audio tapes of celebrities, friends and anonymous hangers-on talking and other marginalia are considered alongside a selection of key photographs, drawings, screen prints and spatial installations, such as the spectacular "Silver Clouds," originally shown in 1966. Edited by Eva Meyer-Hermann and with contributions by Geralyn Huxley, Greg Pierce and Warhol Museum Archivist, Matt Wrbican, who is currently unpacking hundreds of never-before-seen Warhol Time Capsulesin Pittsburgh, this volume brings readers up to date with the most recent developments in the way we see the late artist's oeuvre.

    Cats, Cats, Cats

    Cats, Cats, Cats

    The Philosophy of Andy Warhol

    The Philosophy of Andy Warhol
    From A to B and Back Again
    A loosely formed autobiography by Andy Warhol, told with his trademark blend of irony and detachment   In The Philosophy of Andy Warhol—which, with the subtitle "(From A to B and Back Again)," is less a memoir than a collection of riffs and reflections—he talks about love, sex, food, beauty, fame, work, money, and success; about New York, America, and his childhood in McKeesport, Pennsylvania; about his good times and bad in New York, the explosion of his career in the sixties, and his life among celebrities.

  • Nadar/Warhol, Paris/New York

    Nadar/Warhol, Paris/New York
    Photography and Fame
    This engaging catalog features the photographic portraiture of the nineteenth-century Parisian Nadar and the twentieth-century New Yorker Andy Warhol. The two photographers have more in common than one might suppose, particularly as adroit manipulators who simultaneously promoted their own reputations and those of their subjects. Both men emerged from the Bohemia of their day to become photographers after following earlier artistic pursuits: Nadar as a writer and caricaturist, Warhol as a commercial graphic artist, then painter and filmmaker. While celebrating their individual achievements,Nadar/Warhol: Paris/New Yorkalso illuminates the role of the visual artist in the conscious creation of celebrity and the changing nature of fame. Among the many portraits in this exhibition catalog are Nadar's photographs of such luminaries as George Sand, Alexandre Dumas, Victor Hugo, Jean-François Millet, and Sarah Bernhardt; and Warhols images of celebrities including Mick Jagger, Truman Capote, Jane Fonda, Robert Rauschenberg, Debbie Harry, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Liza Minnelli.

    Shoes, Shoes, Shoes

    Shoes, Shoes, Shoes

    Wild Raspberries

    Wild Raspberries
    In 1959, advertising illustrator and artist Andy Warhol got together with socialite Suzie Frankfurt to produce a limited-edition cookbook for New York's beau monde. They called it Wild Rapberries (Ingmar Bergan's Wild Strawberries had just been released) -- and it's hands down the funniest, campiest, most fanciful cookbook ever produced. Nineteen vintage Warhol illustrations accompany the hilarious recipes -- A&P Surprise, Gefilte of Roast lgyuana Andalusian, among others -- that were conceived by Frankfurt and hand-lettered (spelling mistakes and all)by Mrs.Warhola, Andy's mom.This beautiful facsimile edition brings this classic back to life for a new generation. From Omelet Greta Garbo (which is made with nary an egg and is to be eaten alone, of course, in a candlelit room) to Piglet a la Trader Vic's (which instructs us to send the chauffeur to the famous Plaza Hotel restaurant and pick up a suckling pig to go), Wild Raspberries is pure delight -- the perfect gift for foodies, sophisticates, and Warhol fans everywhere.

    A

    A
    Conceptually unique, hilarious, and frightening, a: A Novel is the perfect literary manifestation of Andy Warhol's sensibility. In the late sixties, Warhol set out to turn a trade book into a piece of pop art, and the result was this astonishing account of the artists, superstars, addicts, and freaks who made up the Factory milieu. Created from audiotapes recorded in and around the Factory, a: A Novel begins with the fabulous Ondine popping several amphetamines and then follows its characters as they converse with inspired, speed-driven wit and cut swaths through the clubs, coffee shops, hospitals, and whorehouses of 1960s Manhattan.

  • A Coloring Book

    A Coloring Book
    Drawings by Andy Warhol
    It was 1953 when, not long after arriving in New York City, a young artist named Andy Warhol had begun to make his way in the world of commercial illustration. As Arthur Edelman, his former employer, relates in his introductory note, “In a hallway of the Empire State Building, outside a shoe manufacturer’s office, stood a young man with Jackson Pollock shoes, a rumpled black suit, a portfolio, and a shock of white hair.” Over several years, the Edelmans and Warhol worked closely together. Their relationship culminated in a coloring book that could have only come from the mind of Warhol, created especially for clients’ children for Christmas in 1961, and somewhat of a cause célèbre when it was published in 1990. Now back in print, A Coloring Book: Drawings by Andy Warhol will amuse and charm a new audience with its delightfully carefree menagerie.

    a: A Novel

    a: A Novel
    Conceptually unique, hilarious and frightening, referred to as “pornography” in The New York Times Book Review’s original review and as a “work of genius” in Newsweek’s, a: A Novel is the perfect literary manifestation of Andy Warhol’s sensibility. In the late sixties Warhol set out to turn a trade book into a piece of pop art, and the result was this astonishing account of the famously influential group of artists, superstars, addicts and freaks who made up the Factory milieu. Created from audiotapes recorded in and around the Factory, a: A Novel begins with the fabulous Ondine popping several amphetamines and then follows its characters as they converse with inspired, speed-driven wit and cut swaths through the clubs, coffee shops, hospitals, and whorehouses of 1960’s Manhattan.

    Red Books Slipcased Set

    Red Books Slipcased Set
    The Polaroid camera combined two of Andy Warhol's obsessions -- the disposible nature of modern consumerism and the photograph as a ready-made. He was an inveterate and relentless user of Polaroid cameras and during the 1970s he made thousands of instant photographs. The near-instant nature of the Polaroid process meant that the photographs could be passed around, admired, sometimes written on moments after the event had been captured. It was a useful tool for a somewhat shy character, one that encouraged interaction and collaboration. In addition to his many portrait commissions, Warhol's Polaroids were used for such Grammy-winning designs as the Rolling Stones' "Sticky Fingers" album cover in 1971. Between 1970 and 1976 Warhol established a rigorous system of cataloguing. He would take home the Polaroids, edit and sequence them and then enter them in individual red Holson Polaroid albums. These albums, with Warhol's original sequence and themes, have remained intact. Red Books is a cardboard box containing 11 of the Holson photo albums of Polaroids. These thoughtfully-ordered small albums, selected and sequenced by Warhol himself, tend to cover one event, be it a weekend in Montauk with the Kennedy and Radziwill kids, a portrait sitting with Palomo Picasso or Bridgid Berlin and Larry Rivers staging an impromptu 'performance' at the Factory, and there is a freshness and intimacy that one does not usually associate with the 'cool and detached' Andy Warhol. A separate black book contains a text by François-Marie Banier explaining the significance of these albums within Warhol's oeuvre and how they act as a diary of his work and offer unrivalled insight into his working procedures.

    Andy Warhol

    Andy Warhol
    Unexposed Exposures
    Starting in 1976, Andy Warhol shot several rolls of film every week and selected images for his book Andy Warhol's Exposures, published in 1979. He had intended to title it Social Diseases but his concept was heavily watered down by his publishers at the time and many of the selected images were removed. This book presents the previously unpublished and unexhibited photographs, over 70 unique vintage black and white photographic prints, that Warhol originally selected for his book. It has been edited and introduced by Bob Colacello, who was also executive editor of the original book. "There is a sense of intimacy as well as of voyeurism, of funny-looking, insecure, wistful Andy, through flattery and attentiveness, trying to connect. Yet, because he was not just any photographer but a famous artist, a star, there is often a sense that the looking is being done at the man with the camera as well as by him. In some cases, the subjects are clearly performing for their fellow luminary, or close friend, or boss. As spontaneous as these images may seem, they are intrinsically staged, with Warhol himself as both chronicler and catalyst of the moments he is documenting. And what moments they are! Only Andy could get David Hockney in extra-brief running shorts, or Susan Sontag batting her eyelashes across a fancy restaurant table at Gloria Vanderbilt, or Halston's Venezuelan window dresser and lover, Victor Hugo, sitting under Goya's Red Boy in Kitty Miller's Park Avenue parlor .... " (Bob Coacello)

  • Andy Warhol Enterprises

    Andy Warhol Enterprises
    Text by Thomas Crow, Vincent Fremont, Sarah Green, Allison Unruh.

    Lousiana ABC

    Lousiana ABC
    This tour through the collection of Denmark's Louisiana Museum of Modern Art includes work by Francis Bacon, Georg Baselitz, Joseph Beuys, Alexander Calder, Andreas Gursky, Donald Judd, Anselm Kiefer, Yves Klein, Roy Lichtenstein, Pablo Picasso, Sigmar Polke, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Richard Serra and Andy Warhol, among others.

    Andy Warhol: Still Lifes and Feet 1956-1961

    Andy Warhol: Still Lifes and Feet 1956-1961
    From his student days in late 1940s Pittsburgh, right up until the weeks before his death in 1987, Andy Warhol drew prolifically. In his studies of the human form, he returned time and time again to portraits of shoes and feet. Executed with ballpoint pen in sketchbooks, these elegant, minimal drawings alternately depict bare feet, or feet in shoes, socks and slippers, and feet posed with various props--paint brushes, wooden blocks, books and of course a Campbell's soup can. As in his other drawings, Warhol's line conveys a Cocteau-like delicacy and fragility that seems far from his more familiar screenprints. Accompanying a January 2010 show at Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York, Still Lifes and Feet 1956-1961presents 58 of Warhol's foot and shoe drawings, all of which are reproduced here for the first time. The volume makes for an intimate record of Warhol's well-known pecadillos and his dexterous draughtsmanship.

    Andy Warhol: Ladies and Gentlemen

    Andy Warhol: Ladies and Gentlemen
    Text by Pier Paolo Pasolini.

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